James Newman Reviews Big City Blues

Big City Blues

Big City Blues

And says:

‘Brazill has a way with words and, yeah, he uses them here wisely. The character building is solid in all his books, the locations are real enough to touch and smell, and the humor is omnipresent. This man’s books are laugh-aloud hilarious simply because Brazill is a wickedly smart humorous writer who never misses a trick. Great stuff. Read it. Spread it. Enjoy the infection.’

Col’s Criminal Library Reviews Big City Blues

Big City Blues

Big City Blues

And says:

‘A bit of what we had in store………. coppers with a penchant for karaoke, criminal families, a Polish policewoman on secondment to the UK, a serial killer called Marjorie Razorblades, an American alcoholic and his irritated wife, prostitutes, death by knitting needle, death by baseball bat, dual settings of London and New York, with a bit of time in Cambridge and Madrid, a few jokes that were old when Noah was a boy, some hat-tips to some bands from yonder-year….Buzzcocks, Penetration, Magazine, The Fall. (Nostalgia rules.) And lots more beside.’

Read the rest here. 

Jason Beech Reviews Guns Of Brixton

GOBOver at his blog, ace crime writer JASON BEECH SAYS:

‘Guns of Brixton is a mutt, bred from Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, Pulp Fiction, The Sweeney, and the Carry On films. All of this could have been a mushy stew, but Brazill has such a way with words and structure that this is all its own thing. It’s funny, as his books always are, extremely silly, but utterly engaging.’

READ THE REST HERE!

Dave Wilde Reviews 13 Shots Of Noir

13 shots2Over at Goodreads, he says:

‘These are all good stories. “The Tut” begins with the unforgettable line: “After enduring forty-five years of a marriage that was at best, like wading through treacle, Oliver Robinson eventually had enough and smothered his wife with the beige corduroy cushion that he’d accidentally burned with a cigarette two fraught days before.” Wow, what an entire history Brazill packed into that one sentence! The second selection “Anger Management” is another short masterpiece. It is sort of a mood piece, but it is filled with lines like: “I’ve heard it said that eighteen months of sleep deprivation can drive you crazy.” You can honestly open up the book to any point in these thirteen stories and find something of interest, some dark haunting poetic line. “The Friend Catcher” is another short (they are all short) that begins with an amazingly thick line of prose: “The morning after Charlotte killed her father, the air tasted like lead and the sky was gun metal grey.” That’s a whole story right there.
Thirteen little gems packed into a short little book. I enjoyed these little glimpse into the darkness.’

Nigel Bird reviews Cold London Blues

cold-london-blues (2)

Cold London Blues

Over at his blog, Nigel says:

‘Cold London Blues has an elongated title – Ealing Comedy meets Pulp Fiction and has a love child. I honestly think that says it better than I could by filling the page.

The humour is everywhere, from the scenes and situations to the crazy pun-filled dialogue. Laugh-a-minute is what it is. It’s also a good yarn.

The grit is also there aplenty. It’s a crime novel and a rather brutal one at that. What’s unusual is the way the violence is often so matter-of-fact. It comes at you when you least expect it and is handled with deadpan weight.

And the characters? You’ll not see the likes of these very often, not unless you pick up another Paul D Brazill. You’ll encounter one of the most unusual coppers in fiction as you read.

If you need your copy right now while you lie on a beach with the sun warming your skin, the kindle (US) version’s for you. If you can wait a little longer, then the paperback’s where the deal is – £2.84 ($1.89) brand new, which is just ridiculous.’

Pat McDonald Reviews Drunk On The Moon: A Roman Dalton Anthology

Drunk On The Moon 2016Over at Amazon.com, she says:

This is Paul D Brazill at his best; the humour is just tongue in cheek but the descriptive prose is perfection. It is so atmospheric it appeals to all the senses; I swear that there was one moment when I could even smell the cigarette smoke curling into the air of the bar (that I looked around the room for some evidence of it). This is a Roman Dalton anthology which begins with the Brazill ‘Drunk on the Moon’, a zombie/werewolf collection. If you read any of this book, you must read the first especially if you are a writer, a would-be writer or a ‘wish I was’ a writer – here is the first lesson. Had me totally intrigued just from the exquisite prose, the story is merely incidental. His dedication, however, to women with red lipstick is as cameo as Hitchcock’s appearance in his own films, if you read enough of his books you’ll know what I mean. Excellent! Pat McDonald British Crime Author.

Christopher Davis reviews Too Many Crooks

too-many-crooks

Too Many Crooks

Over at Amazon.com, Christopher Davis says:

‘Too Many Crooks was the longest story that I’ve read from this author and man…what a story. I think that anyone who can write of Iron Maiden and Makers Mark in the same story will find a fan in me. A recommended quick crime read. I’ll be looking into more from this writer.’

Mark Hewitt reviews Too Many Crooks.

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Over at Amazon.co.uk , he says:

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A thrilling journey to places you don’t want to visit, especially in your dreams.
Death and drama served up with a fascinating slice of life on the edge of society.
An intense read, I was glad to get out alive when the story ended !