Category Archives: Paul D Brazill

99p eBooks!

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N2TK

My NEAR TO THE KNUCKLE novellas are now only 99p each!

TOO MANY CROOKS

Too Many Crooks is a blackly comic Brit Grit romp from the author of Guns Of Brixton and Kill Me Quick! When high-class fence Leslie Hawkins meets Peter Rhatigan in a sleazy London pub, he offers her the chance to get her hands on the Totenkopfring, a legendary piece of World War Two memorabilia. However, after a violent encounter with a member of a biker gang, things soon spiral wildly and dangerously out of control. Meanwhile in Poland, Dr Anna Nowak finds an amnesiac Englishman half-dead in the snow…

A CASE OF NOIR

In snow smothered Warsaw, Luke Case, a boozy English hack with a dark secret, starts a dangerous affair with a gangster’s wife. Case escapes to the sweltering Spanish heat where he meets a colourful cast of characters, including a mysterious torch singer and a former East End villain with a criminal business proposition. While in stormy Toulouse, he encounters a blast from the past that is positively seismic which forces him to return to England and confront his past.

BIG CITY BLUES

London Detective Sergeant Ronnie Burke and Polish cop Jola Lach are on the trail of a serial killer, and New York private eye Solitaire is sent to Spain to track down a missing rich kid. See how their lives intertwine in Big City Blues. British coppers, an American private eye, London gangsters, international spies, and a serial killer known as The Black Crow all collide violently and hilariously in Big City Blues, another fast-moving and funny Brit Grit novella from Paul D. Brazill.

 

And you can still also grab 13 SHOTS OF NOIR and KILL ME QUICK! for less than a quid, too!

Short, Sharp Interview: Beau Johnson

20525595_1907272402872470_5546300016962871857_nPDB: Can you pitch your latest book in 25 words?

BJ:  Nope.  Not enough space.  If I had more space, maybe.  But even then, maybe not.  Hate.  The book is about hate.  How we can use it better.

PDB: Which music, book, films or television do you wish you had written?

BJ:  Oh man, there are tons.  Silence of the Lambs.  Seven.  Lost.  Breaking Bad.  Up to season 7 of the X-files.  The episode where Buffy’s mom dies.  As for books: everything by Thomas Harris excluding Hannibal Rising.  The Long Walk by King.  The Jaunt.  The raft.  Music?  Wheat Kings by The Tragically Hip, our very own Canadian treasure.

PDB: Which books do you think would make great films or TV series?

BJ: I want to say the Dark Tower, but as it seems that particular ship might have somewhat sailed.

a better kind of hatePDB:  Who are the great British Writers?

BJ: PDB, naturally.

PDB: What’s on the cards?

BJ:  I have a few shorts in the pipe, some coming soon.  Bishop Rider has been poking his head up too, just headlining a new finished piece titled Old Ghosts.  It’s companion story to a yarn called Shift Work, where I once and for all debunk his reasons for retirement.  It might include dismemberment.

PDB: Anything else?

BJ:  Big thanks to you, Paul.  For offering this platform and for supporting me in the past.  If memory serves, you were one of the first who started sharing my work when I first got on to Facebook.  I want you to know I appreciate that, Paul.  I always have.

 BIO:  Beau Johnson has been published before, usually on the darker side of town.  Such fine establishments might include Out of the Gutter Online, Shotgun Honey, Spelk, HST, and/or the Molotov Cocktail.  A collection of Beau’s, A Better Kind Of Hate, is published by Down and Out Books.

Guest Blog: Three Hours Past Midnight by Tony Knighton

3 hours past midnightPaul has graciously invited me to post an essay about my latest work Three Hours Past Midnight, a novel from Crime Wave Press, set in my hometown, Philadelphia, Pa.  In the first few pages the narrator and his partner burglarize the home of a wealthy, jailed Philadelphia politician.  It features the un-named protagonist from an earlier story of mine, “Mister Wonderful.”

I typically have a framework in mind before I start to put words on a page, a beginning, middle and end.  “Mister Wonderful” began for me as a scene, a dilemma – a man coming to, strapped in the driver’s seat of a car that has come to rest upside down in a shallow, icy streambed.  He’s got a broken collarbone and he hears a siren go by on the roadway above him.  I worked out who he was and why he was there as that story progressed.  Afterward, I found myself still curious about him.  For a long time, also, I’d had a vague story idea about the burglary of a certain private home in Philadelphia, a mansion near Center City, that many here mistakenly think belongs to a real-life, notorious, long-time state senator.  I liked the idea of a crew breaking into the house and stealing something from him.  As the fiction writer Eryk Pruitt says, some people in this world just need to be robbed.  I couldn’t get started until I had the right players.  After “Mister Wonderful” I knew I had just the guy.

If anything matters to this character, it is his rational approach to problems.  He prides himself on his professionalism.  So, in Three Hours Past Midnight, when things go bad – his partner murdered and the money gone – he has a choice: tackle the problem or give up and go home.  He decides that worse than losing the money, the resulting damage to his reputation among other professionals would be intolerable.

This character is fun for me to write.  I like him because he’s smart and resourceful, but also very human.  He makes mistakes.  He’s shadowy, even to me.  I’ve never given him a name.  I know what he’s like physically – average height, medium build – but facially, I haven’t a clue.  I’m not sure how old he is.  I can only see his silhouette, if that makes sense.

crime wave pressI do know a lot about him. He lives in the moment – he won’t celebrate a victory or agonize over a setback – he just keeps going.  He’s smart and quick.  He’s not a hard guy – he could probably hold his own if necessary, but he wouldn’t want to have to – there’s no money in it.  He’d rather settle things with a conversation.

The characters who know him probably consider him fair but dangerous.  Most others probably don’t notice him – he’s sort of forgettable. This is a guy who people underestimate.  Every so often, a stranger – maybe a civilian, maybe a cop – somehow recognizes him for what he is.

I get bored reading stories that feature a superman or know-it-all.  Worse is the hero’s best friend who is the toughest guy in the world.  It seems these poor guys only exist to get the hero out of trouble.

This novel is also a sort of echo of my novella Happy Hour, an earlier work about a young grifter who has unwittingly stolen forty thousand dollars from dangerous men.  It’s a story of a man on the run through the nighttime streets of Philadelphia, told from the point of view of the pursued.

Three Hours Past Midnight is the hunter’s story. What had appeared to be a simple, straightforward piece of work quickly turns complicated. Along the way, he runs into politics, corruption and organized crime, which in a way are all the same thing.  He leaves a lot of wreckage.  The end isn’t what he expected.tk-bw

I’m working on another piece featuring my nameless protagonist, sort of a follow-up to the first short story, and I’m still figuring out who this guy is.  He’ll be meeting new people and doing new things, and with a little luck it will be fresh.

Thanks, Paul.

 

 

IN THE SOUP Urgent Restoration & 25th Anniversary Re-Release

in the soup

Help restore the damaged archival print of Alex Rockwell’s 1992 indie Sundance winner IN THE SOUP before it’s lost forever.

1992 Sundance winner and cult classic In the Soup is in danger of disappearing forever. 

In The Soup is an acclaimed independent feature comedy by director Alexandre Rockwell. In rich black and white, it’s the story of an aspiring young New York filmmaker (Steve Buscemi) in the throes of his creative struggle, his beautiful neighbor and muse (Jennifer Beals), and a lovable con man (Seymour Cassel), chasing their dreams in quintessential 1990s NYC amidst a cast of oddball characters played by Stanley Tucci, Sam Rockwell, Will Patton, Jim Jarmusch, Debi Mazar, Carol Kane, and others. 

Upon its release in 1992, it won the grand jury prize at Sundance competing against films like Reservoir Dogs (Quentin Tarantino) and Gas, Food, Lodging (Alison Anders), and proceded to play some of the most prestigious festivals worldwide throughout that year, including Venice, Toronto, and the New York Film Festival.  

It came out to critical acclaim: In the words of reviewers from the New York Times, Newsweek, Rolling Stone, Time and more, it is “hilarious,” “irresistible,” “furiously clever,” “a magical and touching comic romance about movies and crime,” “a dryly funny film of exceptional visual beauty” and “a droll, self-conscious fable with an unexpected heart of gold.” Basically, people loved it.

As of last year, there was only one fine-grain, black-and-white master archival print left, and unfortunately, while being screened at a cinema in Los Angeles, this precious but aging, fragile print was accidentally damaged during projection to the extent that moments of the first and fifth reel were virtually shredded.

It’s a great film, so check out the Kickstarter campaign to save IN THE SOUP here!

 

Pat McDonald Reviews Drunk On The Moon: A Roman Dalton Anthology

Drunk On The Moon 2016Over at Amazon.com, she says:

This is Paul D Brazill at his best; the humour is just tongue in cheek but the descriptive prose is perfection. It is so atmospheric it appeals to all the senses; I swear that there was one moment when I could even smell the cigarette smoke curling into the air of the bar (that I looked around the room for some evidence of it). This is a Roman Dalton anthology which begins with the Brazill ‘Drunk on the Moon’, a zombie/werewolf collection. If you read any of this book, you must read the first especially if you are a writer, a would-be writer or a ‘wish I was’ a writer – here is the first lesson. Had me totally intrigued just from the exquisite prose, the story is merely incidental. His dedication, however, to women with red lipstick is as cameo as Hitchcock’s appearance in his own films, if you read enough of his books you’ll know what I mean. Excellent! Pat McDonald British Crime Author.

Recommended Read: Eye For An Eye by Paul Heatley

eye for an eyeJasmine Doyle and her friends are messing about in a pub after hours when one of them throws a dart which hits Jasmine in the eye.  Her gangster dad Neil is soon out for revenge, calling in old stalwart Graeme to track down the perpetrator of the crime.

Paul Heatley’s Eye For An Eye is a brilliant and brutal novella with a fantastically drawn cast of characters.  The father-son relationship between Graeme and his reluctant sidekick Tracksuit Tony is particularly marvellous and the book is as touching as it is violent. Very highly recommended. More Please!