Category Archives: Number Thirteen Press

Graham Wynd Reviews Kill Me Quick!

kill me quick coverThis novella is a crazy crime jukebox that takes in everything from crooners to croakers without missing a beat. The soundtrack of  Seatown touches on its once great era then follows as it slips down to the end of its rope, lurching a last drunken dance at your cousin’s wedding.’

Read the rest HERE!

 

 

Pre-order Kill Me Quick! by Paul D. Brazill

kill me quick coverKill Me Quick! is out on 13 December. Pre-order the eBook from Amazon or Amazon.co.uk. The paperback will be available soon.

Here’s the blurb:

We’re all lying in the gutter, but some of us are staring at the spaces between the stars…

Seatown may not have a lot going for it – apart from the Roy Orbison lookalikes and Super Seventies Special every Thursday night, of course – but it is at least the place Mark Hammonds calls home. And after a decade away, it’s the place he returns to when he has nowhere else to go.

From dead bikers to dodgy drug deals, from one downbeat bar to the next, from strippers to gangsters and back again: the luckless former musician bounces from one misdeed to the next along with a litany of old acquaintances, almost as though he never left. And if only he can shake off everybody who wants to kill, maim or otherwise hurt him, maybe he could even think about staying.

After all, there’s no place like home, eh?

Praise for Paul D. Brazill:

“If you took Ken Bruen’s candor, the best of Elmore Leonard’s dialogues, sprinkled in some Irvine Welsh, and dragged it all through the dirtiest ditch in South London, the result will be something akin to Brazill’s writing.” – Gabino Iglesias (author of Zero Saints and Gutmouth)

“Visceral, foul-mouthed and blisteringly funny, Paul D Brazill creates a sleazy underworld inhabited by dodgy London geezers, Geordie hard men and the occasional shark. Highly recommended.” – Lesley Ann Sharrock (author of The Seventh Magpie)

“A broad range of cultural strands come together in the melting pot and form a delicious stew of criminal adventure… The observations are sharp and the characters create small nuclear explosions as they collide with each other.” – Nigel Bird (author of Southsiders)

“Unashamedly entertains you while sticking two fingers right up in your stupid face.” – Ryan Bracha (author of Strangers Are just Friends You Haven’t Killed Yet)

“The brilliantly named characters, crackling dialogue and dark humour jump out.” – Keith Nixon (author of The Fix and I’m Dead Again)

Number Thirteen Press is publishing 13 crime novellas by 13 top crime authors, from November 2014.

Short, Sharp Interview: Aidan Thorn

urban decayPDB:  What’s the SP on Urban Decay?

Urban Decay is a book I’m very proud of. It’s a bunch of short stories, that are about more than just crime, it’s about people. It is largely a crime collection, but I hope people take more from it than that, at the heart of every story are characters that I want people to see and understand, even if they don’t agree with what they do. It’s been out a few months now and I’ve been thrilled with the reaction I’ve been getting to it, particularly from other writers, it’s been picking up some great reviews already.

PDB:  You’ve just joined the Thirteeners. What’s the story there?

Seeing the cover for When the Music’s Over was a surreal moment for me. This is a book that I started writing around five years ago. It started life as a 75K word novel but I didn’t think it was working. I loved the story but it felt bloated and overwritten. Last year I started following Number 13 Press on Twitter and I picked up a few of their books. I was so impressed with what I was reading I had to try and write something for them. I remembered When the Music’s Over and thought maybe it was something I could turn into a novella. I spent a month or two re-reading it all and sharpening it up and then sent it off to Number 13… And today it’s available to buy.

As far as the story, it’s old fashion noir set in the modern day. I’ve taken a character who’s best days were years ago and forced him back into the criminal world he once stepped through with ease to investigate the murder of his former employer’s son.

PDB:  How much research was involved in the books?

When the Music’s Over took a fair amount of research, just to get the setting right, in terms of location and time. There’s a section of the book that goes back to the early 90’s and I really enjoyed retreading that time, particularly the music. I was a huge fan of the grunge scene as a kid and as I wrote that part of the book I spent a lot of time listening to Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Stone Temple Pilots, Soundgarden, Alice in Chains etc…

PDB: Which crime writers do you enjoy?

I enjoy many more than I have time to read these days. George Pelecanos will always top my list and I’m a huge fan of Block, Lehane, Leonard, Connelly, Billingham. I’ve also discovered a number of talented indie writers since I started writing myself, Darren Sant, Chris Leek, Gareth Spark, Tom Pitts, B.R. Stateham, Grant Nichol and many more have all impressed me massively with their work… And, you’re not so bad yourself Paul!

PDB: Do you read outside the genre?

Yes, I read all sorts of books. I read a lot of biographies, mostly about musicians. I really don’t care what the genre of book is, I just want to read a really good book. I do tend to read mostly crime, but I’ve read everything from Harry Potter to Harry Bosch, from Charles Dickens to Danny King.

when the music's over

PDB: What else is on the cards?

I’ve got another novella I’m writing at the moment, it’s sort of finished but I’m just going over it and making sure it’s in good shape before I decide what to do with it. I also have a few short stories written since Urban Decay so I reckon there will be a third short story collection at some point. I’ve written a 10K short that I’m not sure how to publish, what I’d really like to do is find a publisher that would take it on with a bunch of my friends also writing 10K shorts, a sort of ‘Aidan Thorn introduces…’ collection to showcase some of the great writers that I’ve got to know. Finally, I’ve started a novel, and when I say I’ve started I mean it’s about 1,000 words at the moment so it’ll be a while before that one rears its head

Recommended Read: When The Music’s Over by Aidan Thorn

when the music's overRevenge is bittersweet for failed musician Benny Gower.

Gower murders Birmingham drug-dealer Harry Weir and goes on the run.

Retired enforcer Wynn McDonald is reluctantly sent to track down Gower.

What ensues is a lethal cocktail of hardboiled crime fiction as well as a touching study of regret and disappointment. The action is brutal, the characters are vividly drawn, the pacing is gripping.

Aidan Thorn’s When The Music’s Over is a powerful slice of Brit Grit crime fiction that is highly recommended.

Publishing News!

caffeine nightsOkey dokey, it’s going to be a hot time on the old publishing front over the next year or so.

Caffeine Nights Publishing will be putting out Cold London Blues, a follow up to Guns Of Brixton. As GOB was tied together by Clash songs, CLB uses Vic Godard and Subway Sect songs.

All Due Respect Books will publish the short story collection The Last Laugh, and adrOther Shots of Noir, which is a sharp, violent  and blackly comic look at life through a shot glass darkly.

Number Thirteen Press will publish Kill Me Quick! This is a seaside number 13 pressnoir. Think Charlie Bubbles meets Get Carter.

Like the bloke in Billy Liar said, ‘It’s all happening!’

A Story For Sunday: JUST A MATTER OF TIME BY B. R. STATEHAM

a-killing-kissB. R. Stateham‘s Smitty is back at PULP METAL MAGAZINE.

‘ We walked out of the neon glare of the hospital’s front door and sank into the gloom of the hot still night like unwanted nightmares. Neither of us felt like talking. Behind us, in Intensive Care Unit, was a friend of ours struggling to find the strength for his next breath. Adizzying array of tubes and electronic devices were plugged into his body. Bright screens for monitors filled the soft light of his hospital room with the note of every breath, every heartbeat, every electronic pulse zapping through his cranium. Except the screen for the brain scan was flat lined.

Two bullets in the chest did that to you. Turned you into a zombie. A zombie kept alive by machines.

As far as the doctors would say . . . which they wouldn’t, but you could see it in their eyes . . . Patrolman Darnell Goodland was gone. The odds of pulling out of this one, after all the blood loss, wasn’t looking good. He was alive . . . yes.’

Read the rest here.

And get more Smitty here