Category Archives: Near To The Knuckle

Pre-Order Small Time Crimes

SMC

Hit-men, con men, jewel thieves, career criminals, killers, crooks and cannibals. They all congregate between the pages of Paul D. Brazill’s Small Time Crimes – a brutal and blackly comic collection of short stories and flash fiction that views the world at its most askew.’

Th eBook of Small Time Crimes is now available for pre-order from Amazon.com, Amazon.co.uk and all the other Amazons, if you fancy.

Recommended Read: The Glass House by Richard Godwin

The Glass HouseTroubled rich kids Michael and Abby are kidnapped and their parents are sent bizarre films of them trapped in glass cages.

Michael’s horrified parents contact a private detective, Earl Blake, to help them get their children back but things soon spiral out of control.

Richard Godwin’s The Glass House is a violent and gripping London set crime thriller full of sharp twists and turns.

I’m Interviewed at We Are Cult

CULTBANNER200DPIOver at We Are Cult, James Gent interviews me about Brit Grit and more:

‘Tell us a little about yourself and your background?

I was born in Hartlepool in 1962, which was the same year the first Beatles single and the first Bond film were released. It’s no coincidence, I’m sure.

My first job was on a government scheme updating ordinance survey maps. It wasn’t as glamourous as it sounds.

I’ve worked in a second-hand record shop, a toy shop and as a welfare rights worker. I’ve been TEFL teaching in Poland for more than a decade and have yet to be deported.

What is your creative background?

I don’t think I have one. I played bass in a couple of bands in the early ‘80s but then, didn’t everyone? I did a screenwriting course in the ‘90s and wrote a screenplay. I sent it to ‘a well-known film production company’ but they never got back to me. It was the only copy I had of the bloody thing but I never bothered to ask for it back.’

Read the rest HERE.

I’m Interviewed by Mark Ramsden

SMC

Ace transgressive fiction  writer Mark Ramsden has some nice things to say about my writing and then we have a little natter:

‘In the mid 20th century there were light-hearted crime novels about decent chaps with a taste for adventure. The Saint. The Toff. Perhaps, like Paul Temple, they had a cockney manservant and lived in Mayfair. Mr Brazill’s comedic capers are generally set somewhere less salubrious. Perhaps a grim seaside town, where laconic losers drink super strength lager, which might be stored in their pockets for later – not much later at all.

Instead of a search for the Maltese Falcon a vile gangster wants to know which of his girls are offering, against his wishes, a ‘full service’.
The one liners come thick and fast. ‘”I’m as honest as the day is long”. If you live in Iceland.’
‘The silence dragged like a BNP voter’s knuckles.’
There’s nifty descriptions: ‘He had salt and pepper hair that erred on the side of Saxa, and his face had that scrubbed-by-a-Brillo Pad look favoured by football mangers like Sir Alex Ferguson.’
It’s realistically sleazy and gritty but with enough humour so you don’t need to drown your sorrows – unlike Paul’s protagonists.
Like his Too Many Crooks there’s a sly metafictional flavour but it’s gentle and playful. It won’t strip the enamel off your teeth, like some of the beverages consumed herein.
In short, an original homebrew with a kick. Well worth sampling.

MR  Your earliest influence, writers you most admire? 

PB   Well, I wasn’t a book person as a kid so the first writers I noticed were comic writers like Stan Lee, Steve Gerber, and music writers like Jane Suck and Paul Morley. Monty Smith’s film stuff for the New Musical Express was essential reading. After that, the ‘grown up’ books were by Dorothy Parker, Graham Greene, Kurt Vonnegut and Elmore Leonard – the latter due to an NME article by Charles Shaar Murray.’

Read the rest here.

Another Top Review For A Case Of Noir

aconOver at Amazon.com, Kevin McNamara says:

‘I very much enjoyed this gem from Mr. Brazill. A fast set of interwoven stories about a man on the run from his past. Set in several European countries, our “hero” stumbles into awkward situations and somehow seems to extricate himself in one piece. There are twist and turns and humor as well. Highly recommended!’

Small Time Crimes Cover Reveal

The Dorset Book Detective  has revealed the cover of my forthcoming Near To The Knuckle  story collection, Small Time Crimes.

30726003_10216365354109030_4468694681558974464_nAnd here it is!

‘Hit-men, con men, jewel thieves, career criminals, killers, crooks and cannibals. They all congregate between the pages of Paul D. Brazill’s Small Time Crimes- a brutal and blackly comic collection of short stories and flash fiction that views the world at its most askew.’

Chris Rhatigan Reviews A Case Of Noir

24883052_10215179014491281_249614501_oOver at GOODREADS , Chris says:

‘Luke Case is a “journalist” adrift in an expat’s sea of booze, smoke, sex, shady characters and shadier dealings. He hops around Europe running from his past, but you can’t run forever. Or maybe you can? Doesn’t matter. This is more excellent entertainment from PDB, who makes for a top tour guide.’

Martin Stanley Reviews Too Many Crooks

24882943_10215165683318010_17190122_o

Over at Goodreads, ace Brit Grit writer Martin Stanley says:

‘Fast moving, funny, crime caper with Brazill’s usual abundance of wordplay, in-jokes, and crooks looking to get one-over on each other. It is a mix of the Quentin Tarantino multi-character McGuffin (in this case, of a Nazi ring) and a Carry-On film. It never takes itself seriously and is all the more entertaining for it. Highly recommended.’

 

 

Another Top Review For Big City Blues

25075581_10215184739034391_1005746388_o

Over at Amazon.com, Lizzie says:

‘Gangsters looking for good help. Cops looking for a good time. A private detective looking for an alcoholic crime writer. A young man looking for his father. How Paul Brazill ties these threads together makes for an entertaining novella.’

Recommended Read: Back To The World by James Shaffer

Back To The WorldJohnny Piper is raised and home-schooled by his strong and smart mother until his father returns home from the Korean War and things go awry.

Johnny is eventually sent off to fight in the Vietnam War leaving his boozing, gambling father to dig the family deeper into the mire.

James Shaffer’s Back To The World is his debut novella and it is as richly written as it is short and sharp, like a cross between Tobias Wolff and Jim Thompson.

Highly recommended.