Category Archives: Jason Michel

Grab Exiles: An Outsider Anthology for only 99p/ 99c!

exiles artizan
Exiles

To celebrate the latest ALIBI  noir festival in Slovenia, EXILES: AN OUTSIDER ANTHOLOGY is currently only 99c / 99p!

A powerful Noir short story collection edited by the Bukowski of Noir, Paul D. Brazill. Exiles features 26 outsiders-themed stories by some of the greatest crime and noir writers, K. A. Laity, Chris Rhatigan, Steven Porter, Patti Abbott, Ryan Sayles, Gareth Spark, Pamila Payne, Paul D. Brazill, Jason Michel, Carrie Clevenger, David Malcolm, Nick Sweeney, Sonia Kilvington, Rob Brunet, James A. Newman, Tess Makovesky, Chris Leek, McDroll, Renato Bratkovič, Walter Conley, Marietta Miles, Aidan Thorn, Benjamin Sobieck, Graham Wynd, Richard Godwin, Colin Graham, and an introduction by Heath Lowrance.

OUT NOW! The Thirteen Lives of Frank Peppercorn

frank peppercornThirteen ways to remember the dead. Thirteen histories of a loving husband.

Betty Peppercorn is burning her husband Frank today. Well, she’s burning her property. The corpse she was left with as a reward for loving somebody for better or worse. Frank exists only in her thoughts, anymore.

To her knowledge, Frank had no friends. Betty’s not even sure he existed before they met. It comes as a major surprise, then, when several strange faces appear at the funeral, each of them bringing their own stories of what Frank meant to them.

As the day goes on, it becomes increasingly apparent that Frank was not the man she thought he was.

Thirteen new and established writers collide in this brand new novel-of-stories project from Ryan Bracha, the brains behind Twelve Mad Men, The Switched, and The Dead Man Trilogy. All proceeds will be donated to Alzheimer’s charities.

Featuring contributions from:

Dominic Adler – The Ninth Circle
Jason Beech – Moorlands
Kevin Berg – Indifference
Paul D. Brazill – A Case of Noir, Guns of Brixton, Kill Me Quick
Robert Cowan – The Search For Ethan, For All is Vanity
Craig Furchtenicht – Dimebag Bandits, Behind the 8 Ball
Shervin Jamali – The Devil’s Lieutenant
Jason Michel – The Death of Three Colours, The Black-Hearted Beat
Allen Miles – This is How You Disappear
Alex Shaw – The Aidan Snow series
Martin Stanley – The Gamblers, Glasgow Grin, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Billingham Forum
Mark Wilson – The dEaDINBURGH series, On The Seventh Day, Ice Cold Alice

Grab it from Amazon,com, Amazon.co.uk and loads of other places called Amazon.

Recommended Reads: March 2017

moorlandsMoorlands by Jason Beech

Larry is a burglar who needs to get his hands on some cash. Sharpish. When his step- father – a retired cop – asks him to track down his errant sister , he has the chance of a way out of  his financial problems but Larry soon digs himself even deeper into the mire. Moorlands is a tight, atmospheric crime thriller with a strong sense of melancholy.

The Vampire by Paul Heatley the vampire

Martin works in a dirty book store and spends his life haunting the losers and lowlifes at the nearby motel. Like Heatley’s similarly hard-hitting The Motel Whore, The Vampire gazes into the darkness with bloodshot eyes and is similarly unflinching. Gripping and certainly not for the squeamish.

The Black-Hearted Beat by Jason Michel

the black hearted beatWar correspondent Jude Mortimer lives a life on the edge in the first part of Jason Michel’s The Black-Hearted Beat, which kicks off brilliantly, like a visceral blend of Graham Greene and The Deerhunter. Teetering on the precipice of a dream, a nightmare, delirium, oblivion, The Black-Hearted Beat is as rich and red as wine and blood. Taste it.

 

Jason Michel po Polsku!

noir-rainCzeka, by porwać cię w dal – Jason Michel (tłum. Martyna Bohdanowicz)

Ciemność.

Jasność.

Mężczyzna mruga pięć razy. Pierwsze dwa razy powoli, z wysiłkiem. Trzy kolejne szybko. Jego oczy przyzwyczajają się do światła w pokoju. Nie słonecznego. Słońce jest już daleko, daleko stąd. Od starego, wytartego drewnianego stołu obok bije odór wilgoci. Naturalny aromat rozkładu.

Zdjąłem mu opaskę z oczu. Zdzieliłem przez głowę mokrą ścierą — starym ręcznikiem kuchennym. Na kwiatowym wzorku pojawiają się wilgotne plamy. I jeszcze raz, tak na wszelki wypadek. Teraz widzi nas przez łzy piekące jego i tak wodniste oczy. Widzi nas i nie tyle wydycha powietrze, co wyrzuca je z płuc. Jakby ktoś rąbnął go w żołądek. Mocno. Pięść prosto w splot słoneczny. Na nasz widok wyrzuca całe powietrze z płuc, co do ostatniej molekuły.

Ludzie muszą się nauczyć, jak prawidłowo oddychać.

Nie, serio.

READ THE REST HERE.

The Best Of Brit Grit 2016

marwick's reckoningWell, 10 of the best, anyway. There were a few other Brit Grit gems I also read in 2016 that I really enjoyed. If I had to pick one book to personify The Best Of Brit Grit this year, it would probably be Marwick’s Reckoning by Gareth Spark. However, in no particular order, here are 10 of the best …

Marwick’s Reckoning by Gareth Spark

Marwick is a broken man. Broken but not shattered. Marwick is a violent London gangster, an enforcer who has moved to Spain for a quieter life and who is eventually embroiled in drug smuggling, murder and more.

Published by Near To The Knuckle, Marwick’s Reckoning by Gareth Spark is fantastic. Like a Brit Grit Graham Greene it’s full of doomed romanticism, longing and shocking violence.

Beautifully, vividly  and powerfully written Marwick’s Reckoning is very highly recommended indeed.

thin iceThin Ice by Quentin Bates

A small-time criminal and his sidekick decide to rob a big-shot drug dealer. But things quickly go pear-shaped when their getaway driver doesn’t turn up. After kidnapping a mother and daughter, things spiral even further out of control.

Quentin Bates’ Thin Ice brilliantly blends a fast-moving crime caper worthy of Elmore Leonard with a perfectly paced police procedural. Great characters and tight plotting abound.

Thin Ice really is marvelous, and is very highly recommended.

after you dieAfter You Die by Eva Dolan

DI Zigic and DS Ferreira are back for a third outing in Eva Dolan‘s marvelous After You Die.

The mother of a disabled child is stabbed to death and the child is left to starve.  Peterborough Hate Crimes Unit are called in to investigate the murder and in the process DI Zigic and DS Ferreira uncover a lot of dirty secrets in a seemingly close-knit community.

Once again, Dolan paints a realistic and uncomfortable picture of the darker sides of British life but with After You Die the pacing is even tighter than in her previous books and she has produced a gripping, contemporary murder mystery that is highly recommended.

APRIL SKIES coverApril Skies by Ian Ayris

In ’90s London, John Sissons – the protagonist of Ian Ayris‘ brilliant debut Abide With Me– is out of the slammer and trying to get by, working at a market stall. When he loses his job, he gets a job at a door factory and his luck starts to change. But is it for the better?

Ian Ayris’ April Skies is marvelous. Full of realistic, well-drawn characters, great dialogue, sharp twists and turns,  and with a strong sense of place and time. Nerve-wracking and heart-breaking, tense and touching – April Skies is a Brit Grit classic.

the death of 3 coloursThe Death Of Three Colours by Jason Michel

Jonah H. Williams is cyber- crook, a wheeler and dealer on the dark web. He awakes from a typically heavy boozing session to find that his precious crucifix has been stolen by the previous night’s pick-up. And things spiral on down from then on as we encounter  Bill – a bent ex-copper, drug smugglers, AK-47s, Ukrainian bikers, suicide, paranoia, betrayal, lust, love, loyalty, friendship, romance, nihilism, more paranoia, The Second Law Of Thermodynamics, Santa Muerte – Our Lady Of Last Resorts, an owl, and a cat called Vlad The Bastard. And then there’s Milton …

Jason Michel’s The Death of Three Colours is just great. It’s a richly written, gripping, noir-tinged crime thriller that is full of lyricism, flights of dark fancy and cruel humour. His best book yet.

the shallowsThe Shallows by Nigel Bird

When naval  Lieutenant Bradley Heap goes AWOL with his wife and son, he stumbles into drug dealing, people smuggling and murder.

Nigel Bird’s The Shallows is a tightly written and well-paced crime thriller that is full of well-drawn, realistic characters.

Tense and involving, The Shallows is great stuff!

for-all-is-vanityFor All Is Vanity by Robert Cowan

Jack is a nice, normal guy with a nice, normal family who records the events of  his day to day life in a diary. Then tragedy strikes and Jack’s life spirals violently out of control.

Robert Cowan’s For All Is Vanity is a gem. Heartbreaking, funny and violent, For All Is Vanity is a gripping look at what happens when a good man who loses it all.

Highly recommended.

dark-heart-heavy-soulDark Heart, Heavy Soul by Keith Nixon

Konstantin Boryakov is back!

In Dark Heart, Heavy Soul, the former KGB anti-hero is reluctantly dragged into taking part in a heist which soon spirals out of his control.

Keith Nixon’s Dark Heart, Heavy Soul is the best Konstantin Boryakov novel yet. Nixon smoothly blends high-octane thrills with gritty crime fiction. Dark Heart, Heavy Soul is packed full of tension, action, humour, great characters, sharp dialogue and a hell of a lot of warmth too.

An absolute belter!

summoning-the-deadSummoning The Dead by Tony Black

The mummified corpse of a young child is found in barrel that had been buried in a field years before. DI Bob Valentine digs deep to unearth’ corruption, cover-ups and murder.

Tony Black’s Summoning The Dead is an atmospheric, engrossing, lyrical and  sometimes harrowing police procedural that packs a powerful emotional punch.

The characters are well drawn and believable, the plot is involving,  the pace is whip-crack and the result is eminently satisfying.

Fantastic stuff.

the dead can't talkThe Dead Can’t Talk by Nick Quantrill

Power, corruption and lies would be a suitable sub-heading for Nick Quantrill’s hard-hitting crime novels. In The Dead Can’t Talk, as in his cracking Joe Geraghty trilogy, Quantrill tells the story of a criminal investigation which digs below the city of Hull’s surface to reveal a dirty underbelly.

The Dead Can’t Talk introduces us to two new protagonists – cop Anna Stone and ex- soldier Luke Carver. They are brought together to look into a murder, and an apparent suicide but all is not as it seems, of course.

Quantrill again gives us a perfectly paced criminal investigation but the tension is greater and the twist and turns are tighter this time. The characters are all typically well drawn, most notably the city of Hull itself. This is a novel of deceptive breadth and scope.

The Dead Can’t Talk is the start of what is sure to be another great social-realist crime fiction series from Nick Quantrill. Highly recommended.

Have A Brit Grit Christmas!

martinaI asked a bunch of Brit Grit writers about their favourite Christmas book, film and song, and this is what they said:

Martina Cole:

Well my favourite Christmas book has to be John Updike and Edward Gorey’s ‘The Twelve Terrors of Christmas.’ Film has to be Lon Chaney as The Wolfman. I love old horrors especially at Christmas! And song has to be ‘Fairytale of New York’ as I adore The Pogues and Kirsty! (I remember when they were called Pogue Mahone! Kiss my arse in Gaelic!)

Lesley Welsh:

I’m going to be really tedious and say ‘It’s A Wonderful Life.‘ Still gets to me every time. Music-wise, Jona Lewie and ‘Stop The Cavalry’. Christmas book? That’s a difficult one, I never much liked Dickens’ ‘A Christmas Carol.’ and don’t really recall others specifically about that time of year as I would probably have avoided them like the proverbial. So can I have a play instead? For which I nominate Steven Berkoff’s one-man short play ‘Harry’s Christmas‘. Devastating.

Douglas Skelton: 

The book has to ‘A Christmas Carol,’ obvious I know but it’s the only actual Christmas book I can remember reading! I know when I see other choices I’ll kick myself (so if you have any suggestions, let me know) For film I’d have to go with ‘It’s A Wonderful Life’, although ‘The Bishop’s Wife’ comes a close second. And song – there are so many – but ‘Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas’ has the right blend of sweetness and melancholy for me.

HIT THE NORTH! NICK QUANTRILL INTERVIEW!Nick Quantrill:

Book I can’t really look beyond Dickens with ‘A Christmas Carol’, though you can’t beat a winter’s evening in the warmth with a book from a favourite author. Film Being a cynical and hardboiled crime writer is fine for 364 days of the year, but the remaining day has to be reserved to watch “It’s A Wonderful Life”. Song, all of Kate Rusby’s “While Mortals Sleep” is great and the use of a brass band gives it that distinctive Yorkshire feel that warms me.

Luca Veste:

Book – ‘The Grinch who Stole Christmas’ by Dr Seuss Film – ‘National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation’. Song – ‘White Wine in the Sun’ by Tim Minchin

Matt Hilton:

The Spy Who Came For Christmas” by David Morrell, “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” and “Silent Night” by Bing Crosby

Mark West:

Favourite book –‘The Mystery Of The Invisible Dog’ (it takes place between Christmas and New Year. Favourite film – either ‘Scrooged’ or ‘Die Hard’. Favourite song – ‘Merry Christmas Everybody’ by Slade.

Alex Shaw:

Book: ‘A Christmas Carol.’ Film: ‘Die Hard.’ Song: ‘Feed The World.’

Sheila_Quigley-320x320Sheila Quigley:

‘A Christmas Carol’, ‘It’s A Wonderful Life’  – I can’t count how many times I’ve seen it – ‘White Christmas.’

Sarah Hilary:

‘The Long Shadow’ by Celia Fremlin. ‘The Bishop’s Wife’ (Cary Grant, David Niven).’The World of Winter’ by Bing Crosby

Ian Ayris:

Here we go: Christmas Book – ‘A Christmas Carol’ by Charlie Dickens, Christmas Film – ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’, Christmas Song – ‘White Christmas’ – SLF.

Richard Godwin:

Dickens’ ‘A Christmas Carol’, ‘Deep Throat’, Frank Zappa’s ‘Bobby Brown.’

Martin Stanley:

Okay, right now, off the top of my head: my favourites are Dickens’ ‘A Christmas Carol’, ‘Bad Santa’, and The Pogues’ ‘Fairytale of New York’.

jason 2016.Jason Michel

Book/ story – ‘A Christmas Carol’, Film – gotta be a Bond, not traditional, of course, but the nostalgia of a Christmas evening Bond flick, Song – I would say Slade then again, I have a tradition of listening to Frank Sinatra at Christmas.

Graham Wynd:

Um…’Little Women’, ‘The Long Kiss Goodnight’, and oh, everyday a different answer so….Darlene Love, ‘Christmas Baby Please Come Home’. Best Xmas LP ‘A John Waters Xmas’.

Ryan Bracha:

‘The Little Matchgirl’ by HC Anderson for book, or ‘Mog’s Christmas’. The best and most underrated Christmas film ever is ‘Scrooged’. Song has to be ‘Mary’s Boy Child by Boney M’. Tune.

Betsy Reavley:

Oh easy, Charles Dicken’s ‘Christmas Carol’, ‘Merry Christmas Baby’ – Elvis Presley and film would have to be ‘Home Alone’.

nigelbirdNigel Bird:

Run Run Rudolph’ by Chuck Berry, ‘Diner’ (Barry Levinson) and ‘The Christmas Star’ (it’s a short story, so I hope that counts) by Mina Lewiton.

Graham Smith:

Can’t think of an Xmas book but ‘Die Hard’ and ‘Fairytale of New York.’

Paul Heatley:

My favourite book is ‘Sausagey Santa’ by Carlton Mellick III, song is ‘Merry Xmas Everybody’ by Slade, but film is a toss up between ‘The Santa Clause,’ ‘Elf,’ and Ron Howard’s ‘The Grinch’ – I like the garishly colourful and OTT ones!

Tess Makovesky

I’m not the biggest fan of Christmas on the planet.  I quite like some of the old traditions, but hate the modern, consumer-driven, hyped-to-hell-and-back, be-perfect-or-else-you’ve-failed version, which tends to bring me out in a severe case of Bah Humbug.  So my choices of reading, watching and listening matter over the festive period tend to reflect this.

Favourite Christmas song: there’s a special mention for Slade’s ‘Merry Christmas Everyone’ which brings back happy memories of school Christmas parties.  But the winner, hands down, is ‘Fairytale of New York’ by The Pogues and Kirsty McCall.  Any Christmas song that includes lyrics like You scumbag, you maggot, You lousy old faggot gets my vote every time, and the harmonies (even with lead singer Shane McGowan apparently on such a massive bender he could barely stand up during recording) are amazing.

Favourite Christmas movie: I can’t really handle all those mushy-gushy sanctimonious ‘isn’t family wonderful’ type movies that you’re supposed to like at Christmas.  But Home Alone won me over the first time I saw it.  It has just the right blend of mischief, quirkiness, and sheer evil joy, from parents forgetting one of their own children, to Macauley Culkin’s 8 year old dreaming up ever nastier ways to keep the burglars out of the family home.  Great fun!

Favourite Christmas book: this one really had me stumped.  I wasn’t sure if there were any specific Christmas books, and when I googled, I’d never read most of them and wasn’t keen on the rest.  However, my favourite as a kid was probably ‘The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe’ by C S Lewis for the sheer magic and inventiveness of the story.  Although these days, I probably have more sympathy with the Wicked Witch than I ought to.  Imagine: always winter but never Christmas.  I can think of worse things…!

HAVE A BRIT GRIT CHRISTMAS!

Recommended Read: The Death Of Three Colours by Jason Michel

the death of 3 coloursJonah H. Williams is cyber- crook, a wheeler and dealer on the dark web. He awakes from a typically heavy boozing session to find that his precious crucifix has been stolen by the previous night’s pick-up. And things spiral on down from then on as we encounter  Bill – a bent ex-copper, drug smugglers, AK-47s, Ukrainian bikers, suicide, paranoia, betrayal, lust, love, loyalty, friendship, romance, nihilism, more paranoia, The Second Law Of Thermodynamics, Santa Muerte – Our Lady Of Last Resorts, an owl, and a cat called Vlad The Bastard. And then there’s Milton …

Jason Michel’s The Death of Three Colours is just great. It’s a richly written, gripping, noir-tinged crime thriller that is full of lyricism, flights of dark fancy and cruel humour. His best book yet.

Short, Sharp Interview: Jason Michel

the death of 3 coloursPDB: Can you pitch THE DEATH OF THREE COLOURS in 25 words or less?

A dark and surreal tale of organised crime, betrayal, the nature of evil and one man’s obsession with the Mexican folk saint, Santa Muerte.

PDB: Which music, books, films or television shows do you wish you had written?

Barry Adamson’s Moss Side Story, They Live!, and Twin Peaks.

PDB: Which books do you think would make great films or TV series?

Well, I am thinking of writing a screenplay for TDo3C, but I’d love to see a version of The Dice Man on the screen. Or The illuminatus Trilogy.

jason 2016.PDB: Who are the great Italian novelists?

Well, Umberto Eco’s the big one, of course. D’Annuzio is a controversial one, part of the Decadent movement and the works I have read show a mad artistic genius there. The kind that doesn’t seem to exist today. There’s also the current of “Giallo” literature, one I need to learn more about…

PDB: Is blogging killing journalism?

Maybe it should.

PDB: What’s on the cards?

Chaos and misfortune, knowing my luck.

Jason Michel is the dictator of PULP METAL MAGAZINE. He lives in Italy.

 

A Story For Sunday: Waiting To Take You Away by Jason Michel

PULPLOGO (1)‘ Dark.

Light.

The man blinks five times. Twice slowly with effort. Three times fast. His eyes are adjusting to the light of the room. There is no sunlight here. The sun has gone a long, long way from here. There is the smell of damp from the aged and tired wooden table to the side of me. The natural whiff of decay.’

Read the rest HERE at the ever splendid PULP METAL MAGAZINE.

Short Sharp Interview: Mav Skye

SupergirlsCoverx600PDB: What is Supergirls?

Supergirls is what happens when you have two sisters born into dismal and dire circumstances grow up believing what they see on TV. They have no parental guidance. No adults to trust. There is nothing but television to define their reality, nothing but superhero comics to set their expectations. They watch Superman and believe it, they watch Leave it to Beaver, I love Lucy, Goonies and believe it.  They read Treasure Island and Supergirl Comics and Stephen King’s It, they believe it. As teens they watch Pretty Woman, Kill Bill, Austin Powers and believe it.

Now, the only thing that stands between their current miserable existence and their Little House on the Prairie dreams in one “Fat Bastard” named Frederick Bells. Dispensing justice upon him, and stealing his money, should be a piece of cake…except younger sister, May, is a schizophrenic, Bells is a serial killer, and this isn’t a Disney movie.  

Supergirls is the about the great gulf between what should be and what is.

PDB: Does the characters’ age have impact on how you write them?

I would have to say no. I try my best to kick my ego out of the way and give my characters free will. Whether 5 or 55, they choose their voice, not me. I go with their decisions, no questions asked.

In this case, Jenn and May are two young women who have been raised in the sewers of society. Their survival tactics are the seven deadly sins. Yet, their love and sacrifice for each other is pure and childlike, as are their dreams for a better life. We have two very child-minded women using their bodies and wits in the darkest and most “adult” of situations. It doesn’t make a very comfortable ride for them, but it’s a real kicker for us.

PDB: Did you do a lot of research for the book?

In general, I do hours and hours of research on any given story, even short stories, but not this one.

I wrote the rough draft of this book on the first anniversary of my stepdad’s passing. I was still grieving and wrestling with my emotions about him, we’d had a Jekyll/Hyde relationship. I was also struggling with my young son’s newly acquired mental illness. I felt like I had died inside. It hurt to think, breathe. I shoveled raw, poignant emotion into this story. It helped me cope.

On a lighter note, I did do some research on little things, like whether one could actually stuff a pistol into blue lace panties. Not very realistic, but it works in a story! Also, I needed to find the perfect visual for the “whistling deer head” which is a moose head mounted above a fireplace in Fat Bastard’s mansion. I finally found it in a burger joint I enjoy; you’ll see his head on the back cover of SUPERGIRLS the print version, or you can take a peek at him on my new Facebook page. I also researched taxidermy. May’s psychosis tends to reveal itself in surprising ways, including talking moose heads. I was rather horrified by taxidermy and decided that if we could hear the voices of mounted animal heads, they would be angry, wrathful things. This is exactly the role Whistling Deer Head plays when it decides to speak to May.

PDB: Is marketing of interest to you, or shouldn’t authors bother their pretty little heads with such things? 

Oh geez. Well, in my J.Mac writing years, I never thought about it. It was an absolute joy to interact, promote, share my work or others work on any given social media website. I loved it and had a lot of fun. After some of the aforementioned events, I’m a different person, there’s no doubt about it. I’m not as sociable as I used to be, that desire seems to have dissipated like smoke. All I want to do is put my head to the grindstone and smear my emotions and stories like ash across time and space. (What does that mean exactly? I don’t know, but it’s how I feel.)

Jason Michel invited me to co-edit Pulp Metal Magazine earlier this year, and that has helped me remember how much I loved interacting with others, and editing their work. I am grateful to Jason for helping me remember that particular joy. He’s a creative mongrel, a great person and friend. People should be running, not walking, to his Amazon page. A genius writer.

Back to the question, I think we each have a different path to take when it comes to getting our books to readers. What works for you may not work for me or vice versa. What worked for you a few years ago, may not work for you now. The trick is to be flexible, keep plodding along, not letting your ego get caught up in the highs and lows, and focus on discovering what you enjoy. When the key fits the lock, the door will open, and the universe will provide.

PDB: What’s the best way to spend a Sunday?

I call every Sunday “Pirate Sunday” taken from the times when I used to write the Wicked Woman’s Booty series for Pulp Metal Magazine. These days, Pirate Sundays include spending time with my kids whether playing the board game Survive, watching Rocky for the millionth time, or playing soccer at the park. Then I kick back at night with rum, fuzzy socks, and my favorite psychopath or zombie show. Though, I always drink martinis when I watch zombies.

PDB: What’s on the cards for the rest of the year?

There’s a wicked little horror romance I’m hoping to release in the fall called, Wanted: Single Rose. It’s my first full-length novel and has one kick ass femme fatale fox I’m quite excited about.

I’ve also written a sequel to SUPERGIRLS called, Night without Stars. I can’t give away too much, but I will say this– the darkness we discover in the first book plunges even deeper in the second. I disturbed myself quite a bit writing it! I hope to release it in early 2015.

Supergirls is available in ebook or print at Amazon and 50% off at Payhip.

Bio: When Mav Skye isn’t turning innocent characters into axe murderers, refinishing old furniture, chasing around her spring ducklings, or reading the latest horror novel, she’s editing at the almighty Pulp Metal Magazine.

She adores puppies, pirates, skulls, red hots, Tarantino movies and yes, Godzilla.

Especially Godzilla. 

Look for her wicked horror romance, Wanted:Single Rose, this fall and the second book in the SUPERGIRLS series, Night without Stars, early 2015.

Find Me: WebsiteTwitterFacebook Page, and Goodreads

Exiles Guest Blog: THE RAIN KING BY JASON MICHEL

Exiles cover preview (1)The inspiration for my story, The Rain King, is on one level, a very simple one. It was the song Kingdom Of Rain (LINK http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oEcXz7b2Bk0) by Mark Lanegan and redone by Lanegan and Soulsavers.

Listening to the song can speak to you more than any explanation that I could give. The story is just my meagre interpretation.

On another level, the idea of the exile, the misfitting into a society is one that has perfumed my life since I can remember. While at school in Wales I was surrounded by a mixture of uncouth but honest country kids, a smattering of the children of sixties hippies, their parents escaping to the countryside as their idealism was as blasted by their failed conscious revolution as their brains, and the offspring of factory workers from the Black Country across the border. I was an imported kid with an Evangelical Christian ex-postman father who let me, no, encouraged me to read his small library of books on religion and mythology, including his collection of the classic occult “Man, Myth And Magic” sixties series, and to watch Boris Karloff and sixties Sci-Fi movies.

The other love that my father passed on to me was the passion for music. Bible thumper, he may be, but my old man used to be the drummer in an R& B band in sixties London named The Vampires who had coffin-shaped amps. While the other children at my primary school would be singing along to the soundtrack of Grease, I would have Hey Joe whistling around my furtive imagination. Every Sunday my father would watch Songs Of Praise, switch the TV off and then, we would immerse ourselves in minor-keyed Blues, the desperate existential crisis of Pink Floyd, the manic wide-eyed howl of Little Richard and the funky soundtrack to Jesus Christ Superstar.

Songs of rebellion, suffering and redemption.

Yet while my father saw the light in it all, I saw the darkness. His Christ was a fluffy feel-good saviour, the speaker of divine self-help strategies; whereas mine was a tortured man-god nailed to the cross of existence with the rest of us, forsaken by his jealous and despotic Father.

Exiled from the light above in a fallen and essentially Noir world.

As I am writing this I am listening to the Black Soul Choir by 16 Horsepower where David Eugene Edwards sings “Every man is evil, yes. Every man’s a liar. Unashamed with wicked tongues sing in the Black Soul Choir“.

‘Nuff said.

Bio: Jason Michel is the Dictator at PULP METAL MAGAZINE.

Exiles: An Outsider Anthology is OUT NOW from Blackwitch Press.