Category Archives: Dietrich Kalteis

Guest blog: Dietrich Kalteis on writing Poughkeepsie Shuffle

BlogTourGraphic

First off, thanks again for inviting me to write a guest post about my new novel, Paul.

Poughkeepsie Shuffle is the story of Jeff Nichols. He’s a former inmate of Toronto’s infamous Don Jail. After getting his release, Jeff tries to rekindle a relationship with his ex, Ann Ryan, wanting to make his way in the world by taking a job at a used car lot. It soon proves to be not enough to keep them afloat, so when the lure of easy money comes along, he gets himself mixed up in a smuggling ring, sneaking guns across the U.S. border. The trouble is Jeff’s the kind of guy who doesn’t let the lessons of past mistakes get in the way of a good score. And as things spin out of control, he hangs on, trying to hit the motherlode.

 

I set this one in Toronto for a couple of reasons. First, I grew up there, and I wanted to recreate it the way I remember it back in the mid-eighties. It was a grittier, character-filled place, before the meat packing plants started giving way to gentrification, and the rail lines that once lined the land below Front Street started disappearing, leaving behind its industrial heritage.

 

Second, being located across the lake from Niagara and Buffalo, the city has easy access to the US, making it the perfect setting for a story revolving around smuggling. I read an article a few years ago about a gunrunning ring that operated between upstate New York and Ontario. It was taken down by the OPP, working alongside several U.S. law enforcement agencies. There was also an increase in gang violence back then, and that worked into the story too, heightening the danger for Jeff and the others delivering guns to warring gang and selling to the highest bidder.

 

PoughkeepsieShuffleCoverThere were also bits of personal experience that I weaved into the story, and there are a couple of characters loosely based on real people I had met. For instance, I really did meet a guy who went to South America and stumbled onto what he dubbed a miracle cure for hair restoration. He was so gung-ho about getting rich off it, he spent all his time and even more of his own money trying to get it into the  North American market. Man, did he learn about red tape.

Then there’s the Conway character who I based on another guy I met who wanted to teach the world to sing, wanting me to help him market his new company in exchange for singing lessons. And there’s Archie, the Elvis impersonator, a character based on a wanna-be Elvis I met one morning in a copy shop. There he was in shorts and flip flops — with his morning-after hair and sideburns, looking like he was coming off a rhinestoned night — running off a bunch of flyers for an upcoming gig.

 

Living in Toronto back then helped me add something to the scenes I was describing, but there was still a lot of research to be done too. I went through a lot of news archives, photos and old map books to get it right.

 

Writing this one in first person from Jeff’s point of view limited the scope, not allowing the viewpoints of other characters, but the sense of closeness and the biases of the main character made it well worth it. As I worked my way through the first draft, I was happy with the way it was turning out. Actually I had fun putting myself in the shoes of a guy willing to break a few rules in pursuit of easy money, a guy who figures he’s on the fast track to riches only to find he’s actually on a runaway train.

 

There’s dark humour mixed with rising tension as Jeff keeps getting in deeper. Sometimes it’s his cleverness, sometimes it’s his lack of it, and other times it’s his desperation. He’s just an unwitting participant in his own undoing, and I think readers will like Jeff and cheer him on, hoping that if he doesn’t win, he’ll at least survive.

 

Poughkeepsie Shuffle will be released September 11, 2018, published by ECW Press, and available online or through your favourite book retailer.

DKalteis 2018 Photo credit Andrea Kalteis

Dietrich Kalteis is the award-winning author of Ride the Lightning (bronze medal winner, 2015 Independent Publisher Book Awards, for best regional fiction), The Deadbeat Club, Triggerfish, House of Blazes (silver medal winner, 2017 Independent Publisher Book Awards, for best historical fiction), and Zero Avenue.

His novel The Deadbeat Club has been translated to German, and 50 of his short stories have also been published internationally. He lives with his family on Canada’s West Coast. His website is http://www.dietrichkalteis.com/

Short, Sharp Interview: Dietrich Kalteis

PoughkeepsieShuffleCover.jpgWhat the hell is a Poughkeepsie Shuffle?

It’s when you take the story’s main character, Jeff Nichols, and release him from prison. He tries to get his life in order, but no matter what move he makes, it’s the wrong one. But, dancing as fast as he can, Jeff’s not one to give up easily. And he’s willing to bend some rules and break a few laws in pursuit of easy money, getting mixed up with some guys running guns from Poughkeepsie up to Toronto. What makes things worse for Jeff, he’s never been one to let the lessons from his past mistakes get in the way of a good score in the future.

 

What are your favourite ‘man out of prison’ books or films?

The Shawshank Redemption by Stephen King (1982) is a great novel as well as a great film. One of my favourite scenes is when Red (played by Morgan Freeman in the 1994 film version) tells the review board about whether he’s been rehabilitated or not.

Then there’s Out of Sight by Elmore Leonard (1996). The scene where Jack Foley and Karen Sisko end up in the trunk of a fleeing car is one of my all-time favorite jail break scenes, and one of the funniest too. The movie version was directed by Steven Soderbergh, and starred George Clooney and Jennifer Lopez.

Also on my list is Escape from Alcatraz, one of the top-rated films of 1979, starring Clint Eastwood. It’s about the real-life prison escape of Frank Morris, an inmate who disappeared off the Rock without a trace, escaping along with the Anglin brothers back on June 11, 1962.

On the lighter side of escape films, there’s the animated Chicken Run (2000), directed by Peter Lord and Nick Park of Wallace & Gromit fame. A band of chickens plot their escape from certain death, not from a prison, but from the farm where they live after the farm goes from selling eggs to selling chicken pot pies.

And on the classic side, there’s Cool Hand Luke by Donn Pearce (1965). Paul Newman earned an Oscar in the film version (1967), playing the lead about a guy who refuses to play by the rules. Midnight Express by Billy Hayes (1977) is a great story about drug running gone wrong and the horrors of landing in a foreign prison. And there’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, written by Ken Kesey, published in 1962. It centers on a guy who fakes being crazy to get transferred from the state pen to a state hospital, which seems a lighter sentence – till he meets Nurse Ratched. The film starring Jack Nicholson won all five major Academy Awards, and is considered one of the best films ever made.

I also enjoyed reading On the Rock (2008), the biography of Alvin Creepy Carpis, written by Robert Livesey.

 

Did Poughkeepsie Shuffle require a lot of research?

I lived in Toronto at the time the story takes place, so a lot of the sights, sounds and setting came from memory. I often travel back to my former hometown, and I’m always amazed at all the changes happening, but I’m also aware of familiar places being torn away and giving way to taller buildings and wider roads. So I wanted to bring back a grittier, character-filled Toronto, the way I remember it back in the mid-eighties. But not wanting to rely totally on memory, I gave myself a refresher by digging through a lot of archives, old street maps and a lot of old photos, aiming to restore the character of that era.

A couple of things helped sparked the story. One was a news article I read about a large gun-running ring operating between upstate New York and southern Ontario that got busted by the OPP and several U.S. agencies. The other was the increased gang violence happening in the city at the time.

 

Music features strongly in Zero Avenue. Is that so with Poughkeepsie Shuffle?

Frankie Del Rey, the main character from Zero Avenue, struggles to get her music career off the ground, and her whole life revolves around her music. Poughkeepsie Shuffle’s Jeff Nichols just wants to make ends meet. He’s not as cool as Frankie, but what they have in common, they’re both willing to do whatever it takes to get what they want. Jeff’s not so much into music, but it does find its way into the story. Nena’s singing about red balloons on a ghetto blaster when two thugs come to cut off Jeff’s finger, using the music to muffle his screams. Then there’s the scene when the rocker Meatloaf gets spotted at a birthday party in a restaurant. And there’s an Elvis impersonator in flip-flops who belts out “Love Me Tender” in a barber shop. There’s also a guy named Conway who gives singing lessons, claiming he can teach anyone to sing like a canary, guaranteed. And toward the end of the story, Jeff starts hearing an angel choir. So, while music isn’t featured as strongly in this one, it’s still there.

 

What’s next?

I’m pleased to have a short story called “Bottom Dollar” included in the anthology Vancouver Noir, coming this fall from Akashic Books. And my next novel is complete and signed with ECW Press and due to be released next year. It’s called Call Down the Thunder, and it’s about a Kansas man and his wife who find some interesting ways to survive the dustbowl days of the late 1930s. Currently I’m working on a story that takes place in the far reaches of northwestern Canada and Alaska, about a guy on the run from a gangster he ripped off. Not only did he steal his money, but he stole his woman, too.

 

DietrichKalteis_creditAndreaKalteis_DSC01654CropLG300DPI.jpg

Dietrich Kalteis is the award-winning author of Ride the Lightning (bronze medal winner, 2015 Independent Publisher Book Awards, for best regional fiction), The Deadbeat Club, Triggerfish, House of Blazes (silver medal winner, 2017 Independent Publisher Book Awards, for best historical fiction), and Zero Avenue. His novel The Deadbeat Club has been translated to German, and 50 of his short stories have also been published internationally. He lives with his family on Canada’s West Coast.

His website is http://www.dietrichkalteis.com/,

and he regularly contributes to the blogs

Off the Cuff: http://www.dietrichkalteis.blogspot.ca/

And at 7 Criminal Minds: http://www.7criminalminds.blogspot.ca/

You can also find him on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dietrich.kalteis/

and Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dietrichkalteis/

BlogTourGraphic.jpg

Guest Blog: Dietrich Kalteis on creating Zero Avenue.

ECW-Kalteis-ZeroAvenueFirst of all, thank you Paul for inviting me to write about my upcoming novel.

 

Zero Avenue is a crime novel set to the cranking beat and amphetamine buzz of Vancouver’s early punk scene. The story follows Frankie del Rey who aspires to launch her music career and raise enough money to cut a demo record and take her band Waves of Nausea on the road. To make ends meet she mules drugs for a powerful dealer named Marty Sayles. Things are going well when she gets in a relationship with Johnny Falco, owner of a struggling club on the Downtown Eastside. That is, until Johnny decides to raid one of Marty Sayles’ pot fields. When he gets away with it, Frankie’s bass player finds out about it and figures that was easy enough and rips off another one of Marty Sayles’ fields. When he goes missing, Johnnie and Frankie try to find out what happened. Meanwhile Marty Sayles comes looking for who ripped him off the first time — a trail that leads straight to Johnny and Frankie.

 

I’m in the habit of listening to music while I write, playing what goes with what I’m working on. So, to get into this one I got my hands on as much of the early Vancouver punk sound as I could find: D.O.A, the Subhumans, Pointed Sticks, the Dishrags, Payolas, Braineaters, Young Canadians, the Modernettes, the Reactors. I added some Toronto bands from the era like the Viletones, the Demics, the Diodes, the Cardboard Brains, the Mods, and the Ugly; and Teenage Head and the Forgotten Rebels from Hamilton. And I rounded it out with bands from the U.S. like the Ramones and the Stooges. And there were the Clash and the Sex Pistols from the U.K., and lots more.

 

I wasn’t living in Vancouver during early those punk days, so listening to the music and talking to people who remembered the times helped to get the vibe right. And there are some great books on the subject that filled in a lot of the details: Guilty of Everything by John Armstrong, Perfect Youth by Sam Sutherland, I, Shithead and Talk-Action=Zero, both by Joe Keithley helped relive those times. And there was Bloodied but Unbowed, an awesome documentary by Susanne Tabata. It’s jam-packed with clips, music and tales from that first wave of Vancouver’s punk scene.

 

What drew me to using the punk scene as the setting was its edge and the us-against-them outlook, how that indie shake-it-up attitude threw a middle finger to the status quo. It made such a sharp contrast to what many considered a sleepy backwater town at the time. So, there was this natural tension that made the perfect setting for a crime novel. Also, I knew people growing up who were like some of the ones in the book, right down to a couple of guys who went to rob a pot field and had rock salt shot at them. And the late seventies were also a time before Google Earth, Google Maps and satellite imagery, back when pot fields were a lot easier to hide.

 

Visualizing the chapters like movie scenes as I write is how everything comes together in my head. And I tend to keep the chapters short and descriptions sparse, giving just enough detail for the reader to imagine what’s there so the pace can keep moving. For this novel, I started with a single scene where the male protagonist Johnny Falco goes to rip off a pot field. By the time I finished that scene, I had the idea for the next one, and so on. Then I came up with the female lead Frankie del Rey and the opening chapters just grew from there.

 

Ideas kept coming and the first draft took shape, giving me something that was better than anything I could have come up with if I sat down and outlined the whole story beforehand. Once I completed the draft, I went back and took out anything that wasn’t working, added in some new bits on the second pass — a real ‘seat of the pants’ approach, but it worked well for this story.

 

This is the first novel where I tried writing a female lead character, and at first I wasn’t sure I could pull it off, but once I got going I had fun writing Frankie’s lines.

 

To get any character right, the dialog has to sound unique and natural, like the words just flowed out. And as the characters developed, I kept my own principles and values out of it and just let them speak and be themselves. When it felt like I was just typing their words, then I knew I had it right. Generally, I like to let dialog do the heavy lifting. I love the scheming and the characters’ exchange of words, particularly when they say one thing and mean another, which sometimes reveals more about them than their actual words. And no matter how wrong or devious, I love when they show that sense of righteousness, that ‘they had it coming’ attitude.

 

Levity and the tension in any crime story create an interesting balance. While there’s nothing funny in the crimes themselves, sometimes it’s the characters’ cleverness or the lack of it, and sometimes it’s their desperation that leads to moments of dark humor. And I think there’s plenty of it in this story.

 

DSC01654CropLG300DPI copy 2After Zero Avenue comes Poughkeepsie Shuffle which will be released in 2018. The story takes place in Toronto in the mid-eighties and centers on Jeff Nichols, a guy just released from the infamous Don Jail. He lands himself a job at a used-car lot and finds himself mixed up in a smuggling ring bringing guns in from Upstate New York. Jeff’s a guy who’s willing to break a few rules on the road to riches, living by the motto ‘why let the mistakes of the past get in the way of a good score in the future.’

 

Thanks again, Paul.

Short, Sharp Interview: Dietrich Kalteis

DSC01654CropLG300DPI copy 2PDB: Can you pitch your latest book in 25 words or less?

Zero Avenue is a crime novel set to the cranking beat and amphetamine buzz of Vancouver’s early punk scene.

PDB: Which music, books, films or television shows do you wish you had written?

Dietrich: I listen to music all the time when I’m writing, and I read a novel or two every week and watch a lot of films, so I could come up with a long list for each. I don’t wish that I’d created any of it, but what I do read, listen to and watch sure inspires me to create my own.

I have a broad appreciation for music, but if I have to narrow it down, I’m partial to anything by Tom Waits, Leonard Cohen, Bob Dylan and Neil Young. One of the best books I’ve read so far this year was Razor GIrl by Carl Hiaasen. I laughed all the way through it, it’s terrific. And there are a couple of classics that I recently reread and still love: The Last Good Kiss by James Crumley, and Miami Blues by Charles Willeford. For movies, the Coen Brothers’ Fargo and The Big Lebowski top the list, and for a series I’ll go with Six Feet Under, Breaking Bad, The Wire and Better Call Saul.

PDB: Which books do you think would make great films or TV series?

Dietrich: The Force and The Cartel, both by Don Winslow will make awesome films. The film rights have been purchased for The Force, and The Cartel is in pre-production. While I’m looking forward to both, I can’t help but think since they’re such epic tales that they each would make a better mini series than a feature film. There’s just so much great material there.

And naturally I’d love to see my own work up on the screen. It would be incredible to watch my own characters come to life and see and hear actors speak lines that I wrote. I visualize chapters in movie scenes when I write, and while any of my stories could work, I think my fourth novel House of Blazes is particularly cinematic. It’s set during the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco and the special effects alone would be pretty terrific to watch. And yup, I’m totally open to offers.

PDB: Who are the great Canadian writers?

Dietrich: There are a lot of literary greats in this country like Margaret Atwood, Alice Munro, Mordecai Richler, Leonard Cohen, Alistair MacLeod, Farley Mowat, and the list goes on. In the mystery/crime genre there are internationally recognized authors like Louise Penny, Peter Robinson, Anthony Bidulka, William Deverell and Linwood Barclay.

The danger in coming up with any such list is leaving off someone who’s very deserving. So, while I haven’t read all the talented Canadians authors currently working, I’ll mention a few I have recently read.

William Deverell needs no introduction to most of us. He’s given us eighteen terrific novels to date, from the multi award-winning Needles, to his ongoing and best-selling Arthur Beauchamp series. I recently read Sing a Worried Song, and I am looking forward to his upcoming Whipped. Then there’s the late Marc Strange who gave us the Joe Grundy books, as well as Follow Me Down and Woman Chased by Crows, any of which are great mysteries. And John McFetridge’s A Little More Free, the latest in his Eddie Dougherty series. Then there’s Owen Laukkanen’s The Forgotten Girls, a book I found impossible to put down, as well as Linda L. RIchard’s When Blood Lies. I’ve got a few more by Canadian authors on my book shelf that I’m hoping to get to soon: Sam Wiebe’s Invisible Dead, Ian Hamilton’s The Princeling of Nanjing, Bob Kroll’s The Hell of it All, and David Whellam’s The Verdict on Each Man Dead.

PDB: What’s on the cards?

Dietrich: My next novel Poughkeepsie Shuffle is due for release in 2018 by ECW Press. The story’s set in Toronto in the mid-eighties and centers on Jeff Nichols, a guy just released from the Don Jail. When he lands a job at a used-car lot, he finds himself mixed up in a smuggling ring bringing guns in from Upstate New York. Jeff’s a guy willing to break a few rules on the road to riches, a guy who lives by the motto ‘why let the mistakes of the past get in the way of a good score in the future.’

Dietrich: I have a short story that will be included in the upcoming Vancouver Noir, part of Akashic Books’ Noir Series, edited by Sam Wiebe.

PDB: Anything else? 

ECW-Kalteis-ZeroAvenue

 

I’ve got a couple of new novels I’m currently working on. The first story is set in Dustbowl Kansas and focuses on a couple who comes up with interesting, although not legal, ways to hang onto the family farm during some very tough times.

Then I’ve got the first draft of another novel written out in longhand. This one’s set in modern time, and it’s about a guy escaping with the girlfriend of a gangster who’s hot on his trail. The story will take readers on a chase up through northern British Columbia and into the wilds of the Canadian Yukon.

Bio: Dietrich Kalteis is an award-winning author of five novels and over fifty short stories. His latest novel Zero Avenue will be released on October 3rd, and his fourth House of Blazes recently won an Independent Publishers award for best historical fiction. Publishers Weekly called his third novel Triggerfish high-octane action that keeps readers on the edge of their seats. Crimespree Magazine said it satisfies the need for all things dark and leaves the reader breathless. The National Post called The Deadbeat Club a breakout for Kalteis, and his debut novel Ride the Lightning won a bronze medal for best regional fiction in the Independent Publishers Awards, and was hailed as one of Vancouver’s best crime novels. He lives with his family in West Vancouver, British Columbia.