Recomended Read: A Taste Of Old Revenge by B R Stateham

a taste of old revengeDetectives Hahn and Morales are called to investigate the shooting of a garage mechanic and soon uncover a can of worms that includes  the FBI, Mossad and Nazi hitmen who are in the US offing prominent members of the Jewish community.

Throw a young reporter with the hots for Hahn into the mix and you have an engrossing, well-paced whodunnit peppered with strong characters- not least of which is Turner Hahn with his Clark Gable looks, secret fortune and collection of classic cars.

A Taste Of Old Revenge  by B R Stateham is a gripping, well- plotted, crime thriller that is full of cinematic images and sharp twist and turns, and really would make a great film.

Short, Sharp Interview: Nick Triplow

getting carter

PDB: What’s going on?

On the eve of the Hull launch of GETTING CARTER: Ted Lewis and the Birth of Brit Noir, my book about the life and work of the author best known for his novel Jack’s Return Home, adapted as Get Carter in 1971.

And…

About to kick off the main weekend of Hull Noir Crime Fiction Festival. Along with Nick Quantrill and Nikki East, it’s been a long time coming, a lot of hard work, and an ambition realised to bring some of the most important writers of crime fiction currently working to the UK City of Culture 2017.

PDB: Do you listen to music when you work?

I go through stages. For a long time, it was nearly all old soul music, then cheesy 70s pop, and at the moment I seem to be listening to nothing at all. Or film soundtracks. Nick Cave and Warren Ellis’s music for The Assassination of Jesse James has a broad, sweeping hypnotic quality and plenty of space. Which probably says more about where my head is at than the writing I’m doing.

PDB: What makes you laugh?

Alfie Solomons, fucking Biblical mate.

PDB: What’s the best cure for a hangover?

Currently trialing two methods: 1) a pint of water before bed with a healthy splash of good apple cider vinegar; and 2) not going to bed.

PDB: If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?

Crantock, North Cornwall.

PDB: Do you have a bucket list? If so, what’s on it?

I refer the honourable gentleman to my previous answer. Oh, and a Martin 000 acoustic (left-handed) if anyone’s offering.

PDB: What’s on the cards?

Post Hull Noir – a darkened room, a bottle of something decent and a bunch of books, music and DVDs. And then making space to reinstate a writing regime and bring together ideas for a new novel and some stories I’ve had on the to-do list for too long.

PDB: Anything else?

I’ll still be promoting GETTING CARTER. And as this seems to be ongoing research, picking up leads around Ted Lewis that have emerged since the book came out. Perhaps taking time to pursue offshoots – there was much about the development of British Noir in fiction and film that I’d like to have explored further. And seeing where my writing can take me in 2018 …

Guest Blog: NINA by Nick TriplowBio: Nick Triplow is the author of the crime noir novel Frank’s Wild Years and the social history books The Women They Left Behind, Distant Water and Pattie Slappers.

2017 sees the publication of GETTING CARTER: TED LEWIS AND THE BIRTH OF BRIT NOIR, his long awaited biography of British noir pioneer, Ted Lewis.

Nick’s acclaimed short story, Face Value, was a winner in the 2015 Northern Crime competition. His stories have also appeared in the Off the Record and True Brit Grit crime anthologies and on numerous websites. Originally from South London, Nick now lives in Barton upon Humber.

Getting Carter: Ted Lewis and the Birth of Brit Noir is published by No Exit Press. Available in bookshops or online: http://www.noexit.co.uk/index1.php?imprint=1&isbn=9781843448822

Short, Sharp Interview: Mike Craven

PDB: Can you pitch YOUR FAVOURITE BOOK in 25 words or less?

Commander Sam Vimes ends up in his own past, trying to stop a revolution whilst keeping his twenty-one-year-old self safe at the same time.

PDB: Which music, books, films or television shows do you wish you had written?

Music: Powerslave by Iron Maiden, Long Live Punk by the Anti-Nowhere League, Complete Control by The Clash

Books: Anything by Michael Connelly, Carl Hiaasen, Chris Brookmyre, Terry Pratchett or Mick Herron.

Films: Michael Mann’s Heat.

Television shows: The West Wing, Breaking Bad.

PDB: Which books do you think would make great films or TV series?

Mick Herron’s Jackson Lamb series. Extremely funny but they’re also very clever and relevant spy capers.

PDB: Can you tell me a joke?

What’s brown and sticky?

A stick.

PDB: Who are the great British writers?

Chris Brookmyre, Mick Herron, Terry Pratchett, Tom Sharpe, Arthur Conan Doyle.

PDB: What’s on the cards?

I signed a two-book deal with Little, Brown in March this year. The first in the new Washington Poe series, The Puppet Show, is out in hardback next June.

A serial killer is burning people alive in the Lake District’s prehistoric stone circles. He leaves no clues and the police are helpless.

When his name is found carved into the charred remains of the third victim, disgraced detective Washington Poe is brought back from suspension and into an investigation he wants no part of.

Reluctantly partnered with the brilliant, but socially awkward, civilian analyst, Tilly Bradshaw, the mismatched pair uncover a trail that only he is meant to see. The elusive killer has a plan and for some reason Poe is part of it.

As the body count rises, Poe discovers he has far more invested in the case than he could have possibly imagined. And in a shocking finale that will shatter everything he’s ever believed about himself, Poe will learn that there are things far worse than being burned alive . . .

The German rights have been sold and we’ve also been meeting with a major TV production company and hope to be making an announcement on that soon.

PDB: Anything else?

I’m 50 next year so this is a fair warning for people to start saving now I suppose . . .

Bio: Although he was born in Cumbria, Mike Craven grew up in the North East before running away to join the army as soon as he was sixteen. After training as an armourer for two and a half years (that’s an army gunsmith to you and I), he spent the next ten travelling the world having fun. In 1995 he left the army, and after a brief flirtation with close protection and bodyguarding, decided on a degree in social work with specialisms in criminology and substance misuse. In 1999 he joined Cumbria Probation Service as a probation officer, working his way up to chief officer grade. Sixteen years later, he took the plunge and accepted redundancy to concentrate on writing full-time, and now has entirely different motivations for trying to get inside the minds of criminals.

Between leaving the army and securing his first publishing deal, Mike found time to keep a pet crocodile, breed snakes, get married, and buy a springer spaniel named Bracken. He lives in Carlisle with his wife, Joanne, where he tries to leave the house as little as possible. Mike is also one third of Crime Ink-Corporated, a trio of northern writers who take writing out to the community and host events such as England’s first ever Noir at the Bar.

Mike’s first DI Avison Fluke novel, Born in a Burial Gown (D. I. Avison Fluke), was shortlisted for the Crime Writers’ Association Debut Dagger Award. He is a member of the Crime Writers’ Association, the International Thriller Writers’ Association and the Society of Authors.

mike craven

Short, Sharp Interview: Richard Prosch

PDB: What’s going on?

I live in the country, so every season brings a new slate of activity. Between checking fences for winter and bringing in wood for the furnace, I’m working on the third story in my Dan Spalding crime series.

PDB: Do you listen to music when you work?

I do, but can’t listen to vocals. So it’s jazz from any era with some rock guitar here and there. Bebop, fusion, contemporary—as long as its instrumental.

PDB: What makes you laugh?

Not a lot. But when I do, I blame Larry David or vintage 60s/70s comedians.

PDB: What’s the best cure for a hangover?

Ice water and Karate katas.

PDB: If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?

Wyoming. Preferably on a patch of ground surrounded by a thousand square acres of nothing. Lived there for a couple years long ago and have been working my way back ever since.

PDB: Do you have a bucket list? If so, what’s on it?

See the previous question.

PDB: What’s on the cards?

Two Dan Spalding entries are out in November: a short story and a novel- Answer Death (Dan Spalding). I’ll also have aspaldings_groove_kindle_promo collection of three hard-boiled western novellas out before the end of the year. And there’s some flash crime fiction coming too.

PDB: Anything else?

I’ve started sharing a music-related tweet or two on Twitter, @richardprosch #spaldingsgroove.

Thanks for hosting me here, Paul!

richard proschBio:  Richard’s crime and western fiction captures the fleeting history and lonely frontier stories of his youth where characters aren’t always what they seem, and the windburned landscapes are filled with swift, deadly danger. His crime fiction has appeared at BeatToAPulp.com and several anthologies including Protectors 2, edited by Thomas Pluck, which was nominated for an Anthony Award. Richard won the Spur Award from Western Writers of America for short fiction in 2016. Visit him on the web at www.RichardProsch.com.

Out Now! Just Like That by Les Edgerton

New from Down & Out Books

Purchase links …
Buy from the Down & Out Bookstore or from the following retailers …
Print: Amazon — Barnes & Noble
eBook: Kindle — Nook — iTunes — Kobo

Synopsis … Jake and his pal Bud’s journey begins six months after he is released on parole and is occasioned when his girlfriend Donna dumps him and aborts their child. After a suicide attempt where the Norelco shaver cord he used to hang himself breaks, on an impulse—everything in Jake’s life happens “just like that”—he calls up Bud, who lives by the same credo, and the two take off with no particular destination in mind. They’re just going “south”—somewhere where it’s warm. An hour before they leave, Jake on another impulse, holds up a convenience store to get some traveling money. Ultimately, they end up in New Orleans and then Lake Charles, Louisiana and from there, back to Indiana.

Along the way are many “watercooler” moments and near the end Jake takes a fall when he is caught burglarizing a bar back in Ft. Wayne, Indiana, gets shot in the leg and is returned to Pendleton where he kills the inmate he had a nasty encounter with during his first stay in prison.

Just Like That is based on an actual trip the author took with an ex-prison cellmate under similar circumstances as protagonist Jake Mayes does in the narrative. The scenes in Pendleton are also based on true experiences he had while incarcerated. Approximately 85% of the novel is taken from real life. Portions of the book have previously appeared as short stories in the literary magazines Murdaland, Flatmancrooked, and High Plains Literary Review, the latter of which was nominated for a Pushcart Prize and was selected for inclusion in Houghton Mifflin’s Best American Mystery Stories, 2001.

Praise for JUST LIKE THAT …

“Edgerton’s got a story to tell you so get ready; it’s coming at you fast. Get ready…” —Linwood Barclay, international bestseller

“Edgerton draws memorable portraits of these dangerous and unpredictable characters.” —Library Journal

Just Like That is yet another Les Edgerton winner. In his prison memoir, Edgerton conjures up in honest, Bukowski-esque prose a mad dog life lived behind and beyond the bars of institutional correctional facilities. Literature’s version of Johnny Cash, America has yet another gifted bard to sing the blues of time served. I have long believed Edgerton to be an American original, who has for too long remained one of our best kept literary secrets.” —Cortright McMeel, author of Short

Just Like That has it all. Great dialogue, whipcrack scenes and meaty characters haul logo-dob-ws-400x200pxyou along on a hardboiled crime road-trip worthy of the Elmore Leonard and Joe R Lansdale. A shot to the heart as well as the head, Just Like That is highly recommended.” —Paul D. Brazill, author of A Case of Noir

“Edgerton establishes the kind convincing, and wrenching, interiority with his characters achieved by only the most adept fiction writers.” —Peter Donahue, Sam Houston State University

“Edgerton’s best stories are uncompromising in their casual amorality. They stare you down over the barrel of a gun, rip you up whether or not the trigger gets squeezed.” —Diane Lefer, UCLA and Vermont College, author of The Circles I Move In

“Les Edgerton creates a vivid and compelling world. We feel the rhythm of his language and live in the skins of his characters. Altogether, a memorable experience.” —Gladys Swan, Missouri University and Vermont College, author of A Visit to Stranger

“Les Edgerton writes like a poet with a mean streak, and his prose goes down easy and smooth like good liquor as it carves up your insides.” —Henry Perez, bestselling author of Mourn the Living

“The characters in Edgerton’s world bite down hard and grind up one another with their back teeth. Their authenticity is palpable as soft-shelled clams; these are sad, mean, fully human characters who long for connection almost as fiercely as they fear it.” —Melody Henion Stevenson, author of The Life Stone of Singing Bird

Coming Soon: Manchester Vice by Jack Strange

man-v-ebook_300cBio: The mysterious Jack Strange hails from the town of Huddersfield, in West Yorkshire , England. He’s a man with a checkered past, having worked in a morgue, been a labourer, and a salesman. He’s dug holes… professionally (to what end, he refuses to say – sales? corpses? possibly both?),  even more terrifying – he’s a former Lawyer.
He enjoys parties and keeps himself fit (the kind of fit that makes you think he may engage in fisticuffs with Vinnie Jones on a semi-regular basis, or possibly drink stout with both hands while also throwing  a perfect game of darts.) He is allegedly married with two adult daughters. They have yet to be located for comment.

Follow Jack on Twitter: @jackstrange11
Or visit www.jackstrangewriter.blogspot.co.uk man-v-promo_300c

Recommended Read: Drawing Dead by JJ De Ceglie

DrawingDeadJack Andrelli is a private eye but he is far from being a knight in tarnished, let alone shining, armour.

Andrelli is a booze-sodden, big-mouthed, gambling addict with a death wish, who is haunted by the suicide of his teenage girlfriend and in hock to a gangster, whose goons would be all to happy to shut Andrelli’s smart mouth for good.

And then he meets a femme fatale who offers him a case that he thinks will solve all of his problems once and for all.

J J De Ceglie’s Drawing Dead is a whirlpool that drags you down into a delirious take on a classic private eye story, as told through the bleary eyes of a half-mad barfly.

Smart, funny and completely addictive, Drawing Dead is like staggering into a booze and piss stinking alleyway for a knee trembler and a mugging all at the same time. Yes. it’s that good!

Short, Sharp Interview: Keith Nixon

Dig 2 GravesPDB: What’s going on?

A new series of books out with Cologne based publisher Bastei Lubbe starting with Dig Two Graves on the 10th October. I’ve been signed for two more afterwards. The great thing is I get to work with the genius who’s Al Guthrie

PDB: Do you listen to music when you work?

Nope, too distracting unfortunately. Though songs and lyrics sometimes generate ideas which I work on late.

PDB: What makes you laugh?

On social media – Martina Cole.

Elsewhere Peter Kay. The latest series of Car Share, particularly the monkey in the back of the car, was genius…

PDB: What’s the best cure for hangover?

I wish I knew! As I get older it takes less beer to get drunk and the hangovers increase proportionally. But possibly coffee, bacon sandwich (with brown sauce, please) and a Berocca.

PDB: If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?

Italy. Fabulous country, great people, great weather, great wine and food.

PDB: Do you have a bucket list? If so, what’s on it?

A few things – see the Northern Lights in Iceland, escape the earth’s atmosphere, own an Aston Martin, meet Ian Rankin, live to 100.

PDB: What’s on the cards?

Books two and three in the Gray series. Book two is in final edits (hopefully) and book three is taking shape…

PDB: Anything else?

keith nixonGet the children grown up and through the front door…

Bio: Keith Nixon is a British born writer of crime and historical fiction novels. Originally he trained as a chemist, but Keith is now in a senior sales role for a high-tech business.

 

Keith currently lives with his family in the North West of England. His novels are published by Bastei Lubbe, Caffeine Nights and Gladius Press.

Guest Blog: Dietrich Kalteis on creating Zero Avenue.

ECW-Kalteis-ZeroAvenueFirst of all, thank you Paul for inviting me to write about my upcoming novel.

 

Zero Avenue is a crime novel set to the cranking beat and amphetamine buzz of Vancouver’s early punk scene. The story follows Frankie del Rey who aspires to launch her music career and raise enough money to cut a demo record and take her band Waves of Nausea on the road. To make ends meet she mules drugs for a powerful dealer named Marty Sayles. Things are going well when she gets in a relationship with Johnny Falco, owner of a struggling club on the Downtown Eastside. That is, until Johnny decides to raid one of Marty Sayles’ pot fields. When he gets away with it, Frankie’s bass player finds out about it and figures that was easy enough and rips off another one of Marty Sayles’ fields. When he goes missing, Johnnie and Frankie try to find out what happened. Meanwhile Marty Sayles comes looking for who ripped him off the first time — a trail that leads straight to Johnny and Frankie.

 

I’m in the habit of listening to music while I write, playing what goes with what I’m working on. So, to get into this one I got my hands on as much of the early Vancouver punk sound as I could find: D.O.A, the Subhumans, Pointed Sticks, the Dishrags, Payolas, Braineaters, Young Canadians, the Modernettes, the Reactors. I added some Toronto bands from the era like the Viletones, the Demics, the Diodes, the Cardboard Brains, the Mods, and the Ugly; and Teenage Head and the Forgotten Rebels from Hamilton. And I rounded it out with bands from the U.S. like the Ramones and the Stooges. And there were the Clash and the Sex Pistols from the U.K., and lots more.

 

I wasn’t living in Vancouver during early those punk days, so listening to the music and talking to people who remembered the times helped to get the vibe right. And there are some great books on the subject that filled in a lot of the details: Guilty of Everything by John Armstrong, Perfect Youth by Sam Sutherland, I, Shithead and Talk-Action=Zero, both by Joe Keithley helped relive those times. And there was Bloodied but Unbowed, an awesome documentary by Susanne Tabata. It’s jam-packed with clips, music and tales from that first wave of Vancouver’s punk scene.

 

What drew me to using the punk scene as the setting was its edge and the us-against-them outlook, how that indie shake-it-up attitude threw a middle finger to the status quo. It made such a sharp contrast to what many considered a sleepy backwater town at the time. So, there was this natural tension that made the perfect setting for a crime novel. Also, I knew people growing up who were like some of the ones in the book, right down to a couple of guys who went to rob a pot field and had rock salt shot at them. And the late seventies were also a time before Google Earth, Google Maps and satellite imagery, back when pot fields were a lot easier to hide.

 

Visualizing the chapters like movie scenes as I write is how everything comes together in my head. And I tend to keep the chapters short and descriptions sparse, giving just enough detail for the reader to imagine what’s there so the pace can keep moving. For this novel, I started with a single scene where the male protagonist Johnny Falco goes to rip off a pot field. By the time I finished that scene, I had the idea for the next one, and so on. Then I came up with the female lead Frankie del Rey and the opening chapters just grew from there.

 

Ideas kept coming and the first draft took shape, giving me something that was better than anything I could have come up with if I sat down and outlined the whole story beforehand. Once I completed the draft, I went back and took out anything that wasn’t working, added in some new bits on the second pass — a real ‘seat of the pants’ approach, but it worked well for this story.

 

This is the first novel where I tried writing a female lead character, and at first I wasn’t sure I could pull it off, but once I got going I had fun writing Frankie’s lines.

 

To get any character right, the dialog has to sound unique and natural, like the words just flowed out. And as the characters developed, I kept my own principles and values out of it and just let them speak and be themselves. When it felt like I was just typing their words, then I knew I had it right. Generally, I like to let dialog do the heavy lifting. I love the scheming and the characters’ exchange of words, particularly when they say one thing and mean another, which sometimes reveals more about them than their actual words. And no matter how wrong or devious, I love when they show that sense of righteousness, that ‘they had it coming’ attitude.

 

Levity and the tension in any crime story create an interesting balance. While there’s nothing funny in the crimes themselves, sometimes it’s the characters’ cleverness or the lack of it, and sometimes it’s their desperation that leads to moments of dark humor. And I think there’s plenty of it in this story.

 

DSC01654CropLG300DPI copy 2After Zero Avenue comes Poughkeepsie Shuffle which will be released in 2018. The story takes place in Toronto in the mid-eighties and centers on Jeff Nichols, a guy just released from the infamous Don Jail. He lands himself a job at a used-car lot and finds himself mixed up in a smuggling ring bringing guns in from Upstate New York. Jeff’s a guy who’s willing to break a few rules on the road to riches, living by the motto ‘why let the mistakes of the past get in the way of a good score in the future.’

 

Thanks again, Paul.

Short, Sharp Interview: Dietrich Kalteis

DSC01654CropLG300DPI copy 2PDB: Can you pitch your latest book in 25 words or less?

Zero Avenue is a crime novel set to the cranking beat and amphetamine buzz of Vancouver’s early punk scene.

PDB: Which music, books, films or television shows do you wish you had written?

Dietrich: I listen to music all the time when I’m writing, and I read a novel or two every week and watch a lot of films, so I could come up with a long list for each. I don’t wish that I’d created any of it, but what I do read, listen to and watch sure inspires me to create my own.

I have a broad appreciation for music, but if I have to narrow it down, I’m partial to anything by Tom Waits, Leonard Cohen, Bob Dylan and Neil Young. One of the best books I’ve read so far this year was Razor GIrl by Carl Hiaasen. I laughed all the way through it, it’s terrific. And there are a couple of classics that I recently reread and still love: The Last Good Kiss by James Crumley, and Miami Blues by Charles Willeford. For movies, the Coen Brothers’ Fargo and The Big Lebowski top the list, and for a series I’ll go with Six Feet Under, Breaking Bad, The Wire and Better Call Saul.

PDB: Which books do you think would make great films or TV series?

Dietrich: The Force and The Cartel, both by Don Winslow will make awesome films. The film rights have been purchased for The Force, and The Cartel is in pre-production. While I’m looking forward to both, I can’t help but think since they’re such epic tales that they each would make a better mini series than a feature film. There’s just so much great material there.

And naturally I’d love to see my own work up on the screen. It would be incredible to watch my own characters come to life and see and hear actors speak lines that I wrote. I visualize chapters in movie scenes when I write, and while any of my stories could work, I think my fourth novel House of Blazes is particularly cinematic. It’s set during the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco and the special effects alone would be pretty terrific to watch. And yup, I’m totally open to offers.

PDB: Who are the great Canadian writers?

Dietrich: There are a lot of literary greats in this country like Margaret Atwood, Alice Munro, Mordecai Richler, Leonard Cohen, Alistair MacLeod, Farley Mowat, and the list goes on. In the mystery/crime genre there are internationally recognized authors like Louise Penny, Peter Robinson, Anthony Bidulka, William Deverell and Linwood Barclay.

The danger in coming up with any such list is leaving off someone who’s very deserving. So, while I haven’t read all the talented Canadians authors currently working, I’ll mention a few I have recently read.

William Deverell needs no introduction to most of us. He’s given us eighteen terrific novels to date, from the multi award-winning Needles, to his ongoing and best-selling Arthur Beauchamp series. I recently read Sing a Worried Song, and I am looking forward to his upcoming Whipped. Then there’s the late Marc Strange who gave us the Joe Grundy books, as well as Follow Me Down and Woman Chased by Crows, any of which are great mysteries. And John McFetridge’s A Little More Free, the latest in his Eddie Dougherty series. Then there’s Owen Laukkanen’s The Forgotten Girls, a book I found impossible to put down, as well as Linda L. RIchard’s When Blood Lies. I’ve got a few more by Canadian authors on my book shelf that I’m hoping to get to soon: Sam Wiebe’s Invisible Dead, Ian Hamilton’s The Princeling of Nanjing, Bob Kroll’s The Hell of it All, and David Whellam’s The Verdict on Each Man Dead.

PDB: What’s on the cards?

Dietrich: My next novel Poughkeepsie Shuffle is due for release in 2018 by ECW Press. The story’s set in Toronto in the mid-eighties and centers on Jeff Nichols, a guy just released from the Don Jail. When he lands a job at a used-car lot, he finds himself mixed up in a smuggling ring bringing guns in from Upstate New York. Jeff’s a guy willing to break a few rules on the road to riches, a guy who lives by the motto ‘why let the mistakes of the past get in the way of a good score in the future.’

Dietrich: I have a short story that will be included in the upcoming Vancouver Noir, part of Akashic Books’ Noir Series, edited by Sam Wiebe.

PDB: Anything else? 

ECW-Kalteis-ZeroAvenue

 

I’ve got a couple of new novels I’m currently working on. The first story is set in Dustbowl Kansas and focuses on a couple who comes up with interesting, although not legal, ways to hang onto the family farm during some very tough times.

Then I’ve got the first draft of another novel written out in longhand. This one’s set in modern time, and it’s about a guy escaping with the girlfriend of a gangster who’s hot on his trail. The story will take readers on a chase up through northern British Columbia and into the wilds of the Canadian Yukon.

Bio: Dietrich Kalteis is an award-winning author of five novels and over fifty short stories. His latest novel Zero Avenue will be released on October 3rd, and his fourth House of Blazes recently won an Independent Publishers award for best historical fiction. Publishers Weekly called his third novel Triggerfish high-octane action that keeps readers on the edge of their seats. Crimespree Magazine said it satisfies the need for all things dark and leaves the reader breathless. The National Post called The Deadbeat Club a breakout for Kalteis, and his debut novel Ride the Lightning won a bronze medal for best regional fiction in the Independent Publishers Awards, and was hailed as one of Vancouver’s best crime novels. He lives with his family in West Vancouver, British Columbia.

Short, Sharp Interview: Tom Pitts

american static

PDB: What’s going on?

Other than signs of the apocalypse flaring up in the headlines every day? I’m out there hitting the circuit, promoting my new novel American Static.

PDB: Do you listen to music when you work?

Fuck no! I can’t do it. I think perhaps I could when I was younger, but these days my attention span is terrible. I’ve been known to stuff toilet paper in my ears so I can focus. I see writer’s talking about playlists for their novels, and I think, wow, my playlist is silence. No, actually, mine is the dream of silence. I’ve got barking dogs, loud neighbors, sirens, and squealing tires.

PDB: What makes you laugh?

Just about anything. I’ve had a long history of whistling through the graveyard. Making the horrific hilarious is my favorite coping mechanism.  When they say laughter is the best medicine, they might as well say it’s the best opiate too.

PDB: What’s the best cure for a hangover?

Easy, more booze. Even as I write this I’m comforting myself with a medicinal beer.

PDB: If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?

Hell of a question to answer honestly. I think right now that’d be L.A.. I’m doing my damnedest to bust into the movie business and it’s the only place to be for that. Christ, a San Franciscan admitting he wants to live in Los Angeles? They might throw me outta this town!

PDB: Do you have a bucket list? If so, what’s on it?

I don’t. I feel like a bucket list would only bring me closer to kicking the bucket.

PDB: What’s on the cards?

I’ve got two more novels edited and ready to submit. I guess I have sit down and start another. It’s been nearly a year since I’ve actually done any new writing—as opposed to editing and rewriting. I’m looking forward to getting lost in that world again.

tom pittsPDB: Anything else?

Yes, American Static. Buy it, love it, review it. And thanks, Paul. It’s always a pleasure.

Bio: Tom Pitts received his education on the streets of San Francisco. He remains there, working, writing, and trying to survive. He is the author of American Static (Down & Out Books) HUSTLE (Down & Out Books) and the novellas Piggyback (Snubnose Press) and Knuckleball (One Eye Press.) Find links to more of his work at: TomPittsAuthor.com