Category Archives: Chris Rhatigan

Short, Sharp Interview: Paul Heatley

Heatley

PDB: What’s going on?

 

Nothing much, I’m just coming off a chest infection so I’m taking my time with most things as I get breathless very easily. Other than that, it’s same old, same old. Plugging away, writing, reading – the usual.

 

PDB: Do you listen to music when you work?

 

Sometimes, but not always. If I’m editing then I need silence in order to concentrate, but if I’m writing I can get away with some music. Often I’ll just hit some random tracks on YouTube, lately I’ve listened to a lot of Childish Gambino, REM, Ministry, and, of course, Mark Lanegan.

 

PDB: What makes you laugh?

 

My son. He’s six, and he keeps calling me Paul. Cheeky bugger.

 

PDB: What’s the best cure for a hangover?

 

I don’t drink, so you’re asking the wrong person! Or maybe prevention truly is the best cure, I’ve never had a hangover.

 

PDB: If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?

 

I’m quite happy in Northumberland. It’s the right kind of secluded. As I get older it becomes more and more clear to me I like to be away from people. I’m not a city boy.

 

PDB: Do you have a bucket list? If so, what’s on it?

 

I don’t, actually. I’m pretty boring. All my plans revolve around writing.

 

PDB: What’s on the cards?

 

The third part of the Eye For An Eye series, Violent By Design, will be released on September 28th, and I’m very excited for that to get out in the world and to hear what people have to say about it. I think the three covers are amazing, Craig Douglas of Near To The Knuckle has really excelled himself.

 

PDB: Anything else?

 

Just recently found out the release date for my next book, Guillotine, from All Due Respect, and that will be dropping on February 22nd of 2019. Other than that, I’m editing a couple of other things and planning some new ones, so I’m keeping busy going forward.

 

Author photo 3

Bio: Paul Heatley is the author of The Motel Whore & Other Stories, the Eye For An Eye series, Guns, Drugs, And Dogs, and Fatboy. His short stories have appeared online and in print for a variety of publications including Thuglit, Mystery Tribune, Spelk, Horror Sleaze Trash, and Shotgun Honey. He lives in the north east of England.

I’m Interviewed by Tony Black

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Over at Pulp Pusher, I talk to the Tartan Noir kingpin about Last Year’s Man and gangster films.

We haven’t had a Q&A at Pulp Pusher for quite some time. So, I thought we should so something about that. 

We’ve asked the one and only Paul D. Brazill along to tell us about his latest tome, LAST YEAR’S MAN.
TB: I just read the blurb for LAST YEAR’S MAN, and fuck me, it sounds a bit tasty … I’m hearing echoes of Get Carter in there. Tommy Bennet is an assassin with a hard paper-round, and he’s getting on a bit. What appealed about bringing him to life? 
PDB: For sure, the shadow of the Brit comedy of my youth hangs over Last Year’s Man. The ghost of Galton and Simpson and especially the Tony Hancock of ‘Too many things went wrong too many times.’ Tommy’s had enough. He’s looking for respite. Takeshi Kitano’s sad-sack persona was also an influence – especially Sonatine and the end of Zatoichi.’

Check it out here!

I’m Interviewed By Chris Rhatigan

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Chris Rhatigan interviews me over at the All Due Respect blog:

‘Paul D. Brazill is one of the most entertaining and original voices in the independent crime fiction community. I recently spoke with him about Last Year’s Man, his latest book through All Due Respect about ageing hit man Tommy Bennett.

— When I first learned about the online crime fiction scene about ten years ago, you were one of the first writers I started following. How have things changed since then?

Those were great, fun times, weren’t they?

There seemed to be oodles of cool ezines out and about: Powder Burn Flash, Pulp Pusher, A Twist Of Noir, Beat To A Pulp, Thrillers, Killers n Chillers, Thuglit, Plots With Guns, Spinetingler, Death By Killing and more. What treasure troves! There seemed to be lots of strange voices telling stories with nodules and spikes. I’m sure I would never have started writing without them.’

Read the rest HERE.

Recommended Read: Squeeze by Chris Rhatigan

squeezeLionel Kaspar quits his safe-but-dull health department job and bullshits his way into a journalist’s position at a local newspaper.  However, Kaspar soon realises that it’s much easier – and more profitable- to just make up stories rather than do any actual reporting.

Chris Rhatigan’s Squeeze is just great. Lionel Kaspar is one of the sleaziest and most amoral fictional creations of recent times and easily one of of the most enjoyable. Imagine Melville’s Bartleby crossed with Henry Chinaski and Tom Ripley and you’re halfway there.

Squeeze is smart, askew,  laugh out loud funny, and, of course, not for those of a delicate sensibility.

Five stars.

Chris Rhatigan Reviews A Case Of Noir

24883052_10215179014491281_249614501_oOver at GOODREADS , Chris says:

‘Luke Case is a “journalist” adrift in an expat’s sea of booze, smoke, sex, shady characters and shadier dealings. He hops around Europe running from his past, but you can’t run forever. Or maybe you can? Doesn’t matter. This is more excellent entertainment from PDB, who makes for a top tour guide.’

Grab Exiles: An Outsider Anthology for only 99p/ 99c!

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Exiles

To celebrate the latest ALIBI  noir festival in Slovenia, EXILES: AN OUTSIDER ANTHOLOGY is currently only 99c / 99p!

A powerful Noir short story collection edited by the Bukowski of Noir, Paul D. Brazill. Exiles features 26 outsiders-themed stories by some of the greatest crime and noir writers, K. A. Laity, Chris Rhatigan, Steven Porter, Patti Abbott, Ryan Sayles, Gareth Spark, Pamila Payne, Paul D. Brazill, Jason Michel, Carrie Clevenger, David Malcolm, Nick Sweeney, Sonia Kilvington, Rob Brunet, James A. Newman, Tess Makovesky, Chris Leek, McDroll, Renato Bratkovič, Walter Conley, Marietta Miles, Aidan Thorn, Benjamin Sobieck, Graham Wynd, Richard Godwin, Colin Graham, and an introduction by Heath Lowrance.

Guest Blog: Conflict by Chris Rhatigan

Rhatigan-photo-200x300One Thing Every Reader Wants to See

A manuscript arrives in the All Due Respect inbox. It sits there for some time.

Might be a day, might be a week, might be an hour.

At some point, usually in the morning with a thermos of coffee, I open the manuscript.

There’s one thing I’m looking for from the first sentence.

I’m looking for conflict.

You may have heard this a hundred times, but there’s a reason for that: It’s easy to forget about conflict. You might focus on any number of other things—the details of setting or how to make your protagonist more likable.

But I can tell you that editors are always looking for conflict. So are literary agents, publishers, and just average readers.

You may have a 300-page manuscript with a dynamite ending, but if you don’t establish conflict in the first 20 pages, your manuscript is unlikely to make the cut.

Open any book on the shelves of your local bookstore and you’re likely to see conflict in the first paragraph, if not the first sentence. Take this opening sentence from Lee Child’s The Hard Way:

“Jack Reacher ordered espresso, double, no peel, no cube, no china, and before it arrived at his table he saw a man’s life change forever.”

The reader knows from the first moment what this book will be about. The implied question—who is this man whose life has changed forever and how will Reacher become involved?—pushes the reader forward.

adrThe conflict in the first few pages need not be the core of your novel’s plot. For example, one of the first novels our press published was Uncle Dust by Rob Pierce. The novel begins with Dust, a bank robber, discovering he is missing two hundred dollars. Dust goes on a mission to find the money, roughly interrogating his girlfriend and her kid.

The protagonist wants something and other characters are in his way. It doesn’t matter that it’s a small amount; he will not stand losing the money. This is a small conflict setting up a larger conflict that also tells the reader a bit about Dust’s character.

It’s possible an editor or agent will continue reading past page 20 if you have an engaging voice or a fascinating character.

It’s much more likely they will continue reading because you’ve established conflict.

Chris Rhatigan is a freelance editor and co-publisher of All Due Respect Books.

More 5 STAR Reviews For Too Many Crooks

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Too Many Crooks

Over at Amazon.com, Hector Duarte Jr says:

on March 7, 2017
Format: Kindle Edition

Paul Brazill gives us another slice of Brit Grit in the unique style only he can wield. With characters ranging the class, (and moral), spectrum, Too Many Crooks is just that. A tale of too many people chasing the wrong kind of loot. Think, it’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad Mad World but with a couple more of those adjectives thrown in there.

Settle in, pour yourself a couple of pints, and get ready for a mad, fun dash through Europe’s seedy– and oft-times funny–underbelly.

 

And Chris Rhatigan says:

on March 7, 2017
Format: Kindle Edition
Plenty of gallows humor and dive bars in this short, sharp read that alternates between London and Poland. Another winner from Brazill.

Recommended Read: All Due Respect Magazine 6

adr 6The sixth issue of All Due Respect Magazine is another beaut slice of pure hardboiled fiction.

You get gamblers, wrestlers, bank robbers, juvenile delinquents, drunks, and double crosses galore. Every story is a gem but Wayne Kershaw Goes to Church by C.J. Edwards is particularly good and is as noir as it gets.

The magazine is, as usual, rounded off with some terrific reviews of  some tasty crime fiction and is highly recommended.

Recommended Read: Wake Up, Time To Die by Chris Rhatigan

wake up time to dieWake Up, Time To Die by Chris Rhatigan is a corkscrewed collection of 12 darkly comic short stories that masterfully mixes the mundane with the bizarre.

There are lives of quiet desperation, small time crooks, wanna – be hit men, a heroic Bruce Springsteen, a vengeful Furby and more.

Wake Up, Time To Die  – published by the splendid Beat To A Pulp – is occasionally  disturbing, sometimes tragic, frequently laugh-out-loud funny and a great example of writing on the razor’s edge.

Recommended Read: All Due Respect Magazine 5

adr 5The latest issue of ALL DUE RESPECT magazine is a knockout.

Edited by Chris Rhatigan and Mike Monson, ADR is proving itself to be one of the best pulp magazines on the market. Even though they publish my stuff!

The magazine opens with Broken Prayer, an atmospheric and very well written novel excerpt from Steve Weddle– who is interviewed by Jed Ayres later in the magazine. This is a very tasty slice of what is sure to be a beaut book.

Next up is Keith Rawson’s marvelous Alkaline – a delirious and blackly comic road trip. A kind of noir primal scream.

My story The Last Laugh is next, and after that is  Angel Luis Colon with the story of a gambler whose luck runs out. A classic slice of hardboiled fiction.

Garnett Elliot‘s story is as gritty as can be and a great look at life at the bottom. Great characters and a perfectly pitched ending.

Gabino Iglesias gives us a tale of waking up in a motel with a mashed up face. A cracking story, full of atmosphere, great images and cruel humour.

Joe Sinisi’s The Faces Of The Dead Ones is a brutal but touching love story which ends the magazine’s fiction section with a bang.

As usual, ALL DUE RESPECT magazine finishes with an interview- the aforementioned Weddle/ Ayres double act – and a fistful of interesting reviews of books from the likes of Donald Westlake and Nigel Bird.

The fifth issue of ALL DUE RESPECT magazine is well worth your time and cash.

The Last Laugh in All Due Respect Magazine

adr 5I was very pleased to have a story in the first issue of ALL DUE RESPECT MAGAZINE and am also pretty damned chuffed to have a new one The Last Laugh in the fifth  issue. Here’s the blurb: ADR‘s heads to the Bayou with an excerpt from Steve Weddle‘s upcoming novel Broken Prayer and an interview with the Needle editor. More of the mean, gritty crime fiction we’re known for from Keith Rawson, Paul D. Brazill, Angel Luis Colón, Garnett Elliott, Gabino Iglesias, and Joe Sinisi.

ADR 5 is out now!