Short, Sharp Interview: Ruth Jacobs.

Ruth Jacobs B&W-1PDB: What can you tell us about your latest publication?

I was just about to begin there with Soul Destruction: Unforgivable, my novel released a couple of months ago, but actually the latest is a short story called Life and it’s free right now from Caffeine Nights http://www.caffeine-nights.com/download-shortshots.html. It’s about a father in his forties, Max, who’s addicted to crack and while high, he commits a crime of which he has no memory but for which he’s facing life in prison. My novel, Soul Destruction: Unforgivable, follows Shelley Hansard, a drug addicted, London call girl who takes revenge on a client who raped her.

PDB: How did you get involved with Caffeine Nights Publishing?

I have fellow Caffeine Nights writer, Pete Sortwell, to thank for that. We were both making submissions last year and he’d sent his novel to Caffeine Nights and suggested I try too. I was so thrilled when we were both offered contracts with them.

PDB: You’re an avid user of social networks, blogs etc. Is it for business or pleasure?

It’s to feed my addiction! Seriously, I do get caught up in social media and though it could be said that it’s a distraction, most often it’s because I become involved in something – whether that’s around writing or human rights issues in the areas of anti-sexual exploitation and anti-human trafficking. And I have met some wonderful people who I would never have known if it wasn’t for social media.

PDB: Which other projects are you involved in at the moment?

sd-front-border-1I’m planning the second novel in the Soul Destruction series, which had been started but I think it’s going to change and that means a new beginning. I am writing for a new online publication, Impolite Conversation, and the subject of my first article published this week http://impoliteconversation.co.uk/merseyside_model is about the Merseyside Model Campaign I am involved in. Currently, people in prostitution do not have the protection of the law and recourse to justice when they have been the victim of a crime. For that to happen the Merseyside hate crime model must be made UK wide.

PDB: Do you have any writing projects coming up in the near future?

I’ve a piece I need to start working on soon. Although the deadline isn’t until next year, it will require some research and most importantly, collaboration with survivors – it’s for an academic anthology on prostitution, so it’s something quite different for me.

PDB: Where can people find out more about your writing?

www.soul-destruction.com

(This interview first appeared at Out Of The Gutter Online in my Brit Grit Alley column.)

Leave a Reply